Saturday, August 29, 2015

On #FreeAJstaff, UN's Ban Ki-moon Belatedly Recalls His Previous Statements, FUNCA UNconvinced


By Matthew Russell Lee
UNITED NATIONS, August 29 -- Amid news that Egypt imposed prison sentences on Al Jazeera journalists Mohammed Fahmy, Baher Mohamed and Peter Greste, at 5 pm in New York while the UN had still said nothing at all, the US State Department said it was disappointed, see below.
  At 10:30 pm in New York, 5 and a half hours after the US, the UN's Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issued a canned statement, "recalling" his own earlier canned statement - this from an organization which allowed its head of Peacekeeping to use Ban's guards to eject the Press from an open meeting, and refused to answer this week about the torching of a radio station in Burkina Faso. Here's what Ban belatedly said:
"The Secretary-General deeply regrets the decision by the Egyptian court of Cassation today to uphold the sentencing of Al Jazeera journalists Baher Mohamed, Mohamed Fahmy, and Peter Greste (in absentia), as well as others.

"The Secretary-General recalls his earlier appeals for their cases to be resolved expeditiously and in accordance with Egypt’s international obligations to protect freedom of expression and association and in full observance of due process guarantees.

"The Secretary-General underscores once again the importance of pluralism and respect for fundamental freedoms for the long-term prosperity and stability of Egypt."
  The US's 5 pm statement:
"The United States is deeply disappointed and concerned by the verdict handed down by an Egyptian court to the three Al-Jazeera journalists - Mohamed Fahmy, Baher Mohamed, and Peter Greste. The freedom of the press to investigate, report, and comment – even when its perspective is unpopular or disputed – is fundamental to any free society and essential to democratic development.

"We urge the Government of Egypt to take all available measures to redress this verdict, which undermines the very freedom of expression necessary for stability and development."
  But what will the US actually DO about this? And the UN? It remained silent, just as it refused to answer Press questions about the burning-down of a radio station in Burkina Faso, as raised by the Free UN Coalition for Access (FUNCA).
  Back on February 13, 2015, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said:
"The Secretary-General welcomes the decision by the Egyptian authorities to release on bail the journalists Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed. He hopes that their cases, as well as those of other journalists in detention, will be resolved expeditiously and in accordance with Egypt’s international obligations to protect the freedoms of expression and association."
   Ban Ki-moon didn't explain his silence while in Ethiopia for the recent African Union summit about the terrorism trial of that country's Zone 9 Bloggers.
  The Free UN Coalition for Access has been asking Ban's UN, and those who pass through it, about #FreeZone9Bloggers, as it asked about Peter Greste and his colleagues, for example here.
  On February 12, 2015 across First Avenue from the UN there was a panel discussion on protection of journalists at the International Peace Institute. Al Jazeera's Gabriel Elizondo spoke.
 Inner City Press ran across First Avenue and posed a question: does the UN system do for independent journalists and bloggers what it does for corporate or state media?
  The panelist who answered was David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression. Kaye said, "As an independent journalist, it's good to see you here. From different perspectives, I think that's right. Sometimes the UN can do so loudly and publicly. Some situation might call for a little bit more of a quieter engagement."
 
  Rapporteur Kaye said that "from the OHCHR perspective, we have different tools. Our first tool is to communicate with governments on the quiet side, send them allegation letters or urgent appeals, Zone 9 Bloggers being a good exampe of that.
If we don't get a response, to issue press releases, to call out bad behavior. I agree with the tenor or your comment -- we should be out there calling out the bad behavior at the moment that it happens, quietly or more publicly. Article 19 is not written to protect only journalists, it protects everyone's right to seek, receive and impart information."
 
  The other panelists were Bård Glad Pedersen, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Norway, Agnes Callamard, Director of the Global Freedom of Expression and Information Project at Columbia University and former Executive Director of Article 19, Matthew Rosenberg, Foreign Correspondent of the New York Times (with interesting stories of Afghanistan but who declined to discuss the NYT's coverage of Iraq before the US invasion) and Judith Matloff of Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. There will be video.

 
  

On #FreeAJstaff, US Urges Egypt to Redress Verdict - Or What? UN Silent


By Matthew Russell Lee
UNITED NATIONS, August 29 -- Amid news that Egypt imposed prison sentences on Al Jazeera journalists Mohammed Fahmy, Baher Mohamed and Peter Greste, while the UN had still said nothing at all, the US State Department said:
"The United States is deeply disappointed and concerned by the verdict handed down by an Egyptian court to the three Al-Jazeera journalists - Mohamed Fahmy, Baher Mohamed, and Peter Greste. The freedom of the press to investigate, report, and comment – even when its perspective is unpopular or disputed – is fundamental to any free society and essential to democratic development.

"We urge the Government of Egypt to take all available measures to redress this verdict, which undermines the very freedom of expression necessary for stability and development."
  But what will the US actually DO about this? And the UN? It remained silent, just as it refused to answer Press questions about the burning-down of a radio station in Burkina Faso, as raised by the Free UN Coalition for Access (FUNCA).
  Back on February 13, 2015, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said:
"The Secretary-General welcomes the decision by the Egyptian authorities to release on bail the journalists Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed. He hopes that their cases, as well as those of other journalists in detention, will be resolved expeditiously and in accordance with Egypt’s international obligations to protect the freedoms of expression and association."
   Ban Ki-moon didn't explain his silence while in Ethiopia for the recent African Union summit about the terrorism trial of that country's Zone 9 Bloggers.
  The Free UN Coalition for Access has been asking Ban's UN, and those who pass through it, about #FreeZone9Bloggers, as it asked about Peter Greste and his colleagues, for example here.
  On February 12, 2015 across First Avenue from the UN there was a panel discussion on protection of journalists at the International Peace Institute. Al Jazeera's Gabriel Elizondo spoke.
 Inner City Press ran across First Avenue and posed a question: does the UN system do for independent journalists and bloggers what it does for corporate or state media?
  The panelist who answered was David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression. Kaye said, "As an independent journalist, it's good to see you here. From different perspectives, I think that's right. Sometimes the UN can do so loudly and publicly. Some situation might call for a little bit more of a quieter engagement."

  Rapporteur Kaye said that "from the OHCHR perspective, we have different tools. Our first tool is to communicate with governments on the quiet side, send them allegation letters or urgent appeals, Zone 9 Bloggers being a good exampe of that.
If we don't get a response, to issue press releases, to call out bad behavior. I agree with the tenor or your comment -- we should be out there calling out the bad behavior at the moment that it happens, quietly or more publicly. Article 19 is not written to protect only journalists, it protects everyone's right to seek, receive and impart information."

  The other panelists were Bård Glad Pedersen, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Norway, Agnes Callamard, Director of the Global Freedom of Expression and Information Project at Columbia University and former Executive Director of Article 19, Matthew Rosenberg, Foreign Correspondent of the New York Times (with interesting stories of Afghanistan but who declined to discuss the NYT's coverage of Iraq before the US invasion) and Judith Matloff of Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. There will be video.

 
  

Friday, August 28, 2015

On Sri Lanka, Lobbying of US Exposed, But UN's Weakening Still UNcovered, Insiders Tried to Censor


By Matthew Russell Lee
UNITED NATIONS, August 28 -- While the UN and now US helps the Sri Lankan government delay and perhaps blunt the report into war crimes, on August 28 FP ran a detailed story about Sri Lanka's lobbying in the US, through Imaad Zuberi.
 But the article made no link to the UN's ever-weakening position. This has become typical. The UN is, after all, where the decision to grant a UN screening of the Sri Lankan government's war crimes denial film was made by a person who had previously received Sri Lankan Ambassador Palitha Kohona's (rent) payment, coverage of which led to censorship, here, and this obtained under FOIA, citing Sri Lanka, UNcomfortable for UN insiders.
 On August 13 Inner City Press asked UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Stephane Dujarric about torture in the country - including in 2015. From the UN's transcript:
Inner City Press: on torture, there’s a report by a group called Freedom From Torture about Sri Lanka, and although some of the witness statements they get are from a previous couple of years ago, they’re actually documenting cases in 2015 even since the election of Mr. Sirisena of the unauthorized detention and torture of people perceived as having been a part of the LTTE in the past.  And I wonder, given the UN’s engagement, what you read out here about the million dollars, about rehabilitation, one of the testimonies is from someone who was, quote, rehabilitated, then released, picked up in a white van, tortured…

Spokesman Dujarric:  I haven’t seen those reports.  Obviously, we stand clearly against the use of torture.
 We'll see.  While FP on August 28 ran a detailed story about Sri Lanka's lobbying in the US, the article made no link to the UN's ever-weakening position. This has become typical.
The UN delayed the war crime report on Sri Lanka until September. UN documents leaked to Channel 4 indicate that the UN is trying to undercut that report and support a merely national investigation, or cover-up. 
  Inner City Press asked the UN about it on July 30 and July 31, first two responses below, and on August 5 UN Spokesman Stephane Dujarric returned with a third response. Third time's the charm? Here's what he said:
And I’ve asked to offer some more details and clarification to the UN’s support to the Government and people in Sri Lanka.

And so as I said last Friday, the UN supports the Government and the people of Sri Lanka in their efforts to advance reconciliation and accountability.  At the request of the Government of Sri Lanka, the UN is exploring the provision of a broad package of technical and financial assistance in consultation with all key stakeholders.  The framework of UN support for peacebuilding in Sri Lanka was presented in Sri Lanka last June by the Resident Coordinator.  And that presentation is available online on the UN’s country office in Sri Lanka and that’s un.lk.

What is being discussed for support by the Peacebuilding Fund are initiatives to advance the process of reconciliation in Sri Lanka through the resettlement of internally displaced persons, national reconciliation, and the development of credible transitional justice mechanisms in line with international standards.  UN support is always built on the basis of inclusive, transparent and participatory consultations with all key stakeholders.

$1 million has already been disbursed to support resettlement and integration initiatives for the remaining internally displaced persons in the north and east on seized land that has been returned by the Government.  For the rest, the UN continues to consult with the Government of Sri Lanka, and all key stakeholders, to finalize the details of UN support.

The same principle of inclusive, participatory and consultative processes will apply to UN support for the establishment of credible accountability and reconciliation mechanisms that meet international standards.

And lastly, the UN of course believes that there should be genuine and inclusive consultations on a national basis, including the Northern Province, to help arrive at the right model in the Sri Lankan context. Done.  Matthew.

Inner City Press:  Thanks for that.  I’m going to have to, I guess, go over that Sri Lanka statement. 
  Here is what Dujarric was responding to: on July 31, Inner City Press asked UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric, transcript here:
Inner City Press: yesterday I’d asked you about Sri Lanka and this memo that’s emerged where the UN appears to be working for a purely national mechanism.  And the foreign ministry spokesman there has spoken today about Mr. Feltman’s trip and has mentioned the Peacebuilding Fund.  So I wanted to ask you more specifically, is Mr. Taranco and the Peacebuilding Fund considering funding a purely national accountability mechanism in Sri Lanka contrary to what’s been said here and to the Human Rights Council report that’s due in September?

Spokesman Dujarric:  I think what I can tell you is that the UN supports the Government and the people of Sri Lanka and their efforts to advance reconciliation and accountability as evidenced by commitments made by the Secretary General and during the Under-Secretary-General’s recent visit — Feltman’s recent visit to Sri Lanka.  In this regard, we’re exploring provision of a broad package of technical and financial assistance at the request of the Chief Minister, also including the support of the Northern Province to bolster citizen confidence in the peace process.  What is currently under discussion for support by the Peacebuilding Fund are initiatives to advance the process of reconciliation in Sri Lanka by resettlement of internally displaced persons, national reconciliation, strengthening human rights mechanism, and ending impunity.  The UN support is always based on the basis of inclusive and participatory consultations with all key stakeholders.  And my understanding is that already $1 million have been already dispersed to support resettlement and integration initiatives for the remaining internally displaced people in the north and east on land that’s been… on seized land that have been returned by the Government.  For the rest, we continue to consult with the Government of Sri Lanka and the Northern Provincial Council and all key stakeholders to finalize the UN support.

Inner City Press:  Are you saying this Peacebuilding Fund support is not for an accountability mechanism that would be entirely national, which is the one denounced by the Tamil group that you mentioned?

Spokesman:  You know, I think the… whether there should be domestic or international process, the… I think what we are looking at is obviously implementing projects both with the support of the Government and the Northern Provincial Council.  If I have more, I will share it with you.

Inner City Press:  What about an international mechanism?

Spokesman:  I think, you know, whether it’s domestic or international, that will need to be determined.  We are obviously awaiting the High Commissioner’s report and recommendations to make that decision.
 We'll have more on this.
 Back on July 30, Inner City Press asked UN spokesman Dujarric, video hereUN transcript here:
Inner City Press: this has to do with the UN’s engagement on the issue of Sri Lanka.  There’s been a… Channel 4 has published what they say is a leaked UN document in which it appears that the UN is preparing to give its blessing to an entirely national accountability mechanism that would involve the National Provincial… according to the document, Northern Provincial Council, Tamil, which they deny that they ever saw it.  They say it’s an outrage and would be a… a… kind of selling out the Human Rights Council and any international mechanism.  I wanted to know, since I saw the pictures of Mr. [Jeffrey] Feltman meeting with that group and that there was a lot of discussions of documents going back and forth, is the document referred to by Channel 4 a document that Mr. Feltman had?

Spokesman:  Let me see… I don’t have any language on that with me here. 
  Five hours later, no answer from Dujarric - who had, it emerged, provided notice of Ban Ki-moon's visit to the US White House only to the same UN Censorship Alliance president, Giampaoli Pioli, who unilaterally granted a UN screening of "Lies Agreed To" after renting one of his apartments to Sri Lanka's Palitha Kohona. This is today's UN.

Back on June 24, Inner City Press asked UN Spokesman Dujarric:
Inner City Press: Sri Lanka.  I wanted to get your comment on this, given the Secretary-General's historic involvement.  It's been now confirmed by the Foreign Minister there that the promised internal domestic human rights investigation into crimes in the final stages of the conflict is now not going to take place until September, and now this is being laid off on elections, due to the failure to dissolve parliament.  So, I guess, given that the Secretary-General, it seems, kind of supported the delay, what's the response?

Spokesman Dujararic:  I don't have any language on that, but I will harvest some for you.
  But the language "harvested" did not address the delay. Dujarric's deputy Farhan Haq on June 25 returned with this answer to Inner City Press:
"We were also asked earlier about accountability in Sri Lanka.  I can say that the new Government in Sri Lanka has passed a constitutional amendment which, if implemented appropriately, brings renewed hope for democracy and the rule of law.  In this regard, it is important that the Government consults broadly with all political parties, civil society, and above all victims and their families, to ensure full national support and ownership of these processes.

"The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights remains engaged in discussions with the Sri Lankan authorities on the need for transparent and inclusive processes to develop credible mechanisms for accountability and reconciliation."
  So delaying or even dispensing with the promised domestic war crimes investigation is now OK with Ban's UN? We'll have more on this.
Back in May, with the UN's already long delayed report into war crimes in Sri Lanka postponed until at least September, now one of those most responsible for the crimes in 2009, Jagath Dias of the 57th Division, was named Chief of Staff of the Army. 
  One wondered if those recently praising the Sri Lankan government, from UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to US Secretary of State John Kerry during his visit two weeks ago will say anything about this. 
  On May 18, Inner City Press asked Ban's deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq if Ban had any comment on Dias, named in Ban's own report on Sri Lanka, getting this post.
  Haq said to wait and see what the Human Rights Council says -- the Human Rights Council which already delayed release of their report.Video here.

  Dias was ejected from Germany and Switzerland, as a Sri Lankan diplomat, for his past.  At the UN, equally problematic military figureShavendra Silva at a screening of the Rajapaksa government's war crimes denial film "Lies Agreed To" chided Inner City Press for attribution to him the acts of Dias' 57th Regiment. 
  Now Silva is in War College in India and Dias is Army chief of staff. Will anything be said by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Prince Zeid, now embroiled in a scandal about OHCHR's seeming cover up for child rapes by French troops in the Central African Republic, and letting French UN Peacekeepin chief Herve Ladsous try to fire the OHCHR whistleblower? What has changed?
 Inside the UN in September 2011 the government's "Lies Agreed To" -- but NOT "No Fire Zone" -- was screened.  When Inner City Press reported on the screening, then on the background fact that the person who agreed to the screening, Giampaolo Pioli, had previously been the landlord of Palitha Kohona, who as Sri Lanka's Ambassador requested the screen in the UN hosted by the United Nations Correspondents Association, then and now headed by Pioli, demands for censorship and expulsion began.
 Unhappy with Inner City Press reporting, Pioli demanded that the story come down.
  When Inner City Press instead of censorship offered amplifications and to publish a letter to the editor of any length, Pioli rejected it and pushed to get Inner City Press thrown out. After some of this was reported in the media in Sri Lanka, and Inner City Press informed Pioli of this and of death threats it had received, Pioli refused to suspend his campaign, instead trying to use the threats as leverage to get Inner City Press to publish a "box," that he would dictate, on the front of its website. 
  In this audio clip, after Inner City Press informed Pioli and other UNCA Executive Committee members that their kangaroo court proceeding had given rise to death threats, Pioli demands a "box of apology... as long as it is Inner City Press." 
  This is what UNCA became, the UN's Censorship Alliance, and what it is, and functions as. Inner City Press when its elected term on the UNCA Executive Committee ended quit the group and co-founded the new Free UN Coalition for Access, now defending the rights of journalists from Somaliland to Bangladesh and beyond. We will have more on this.

Pioli & Ban Ki-moon, Sri Lanka war crimes denial not shown. UN Photo/Mark Garten

And it has been on HuffPost Live, here. Watch this site.


 
  

UN Silent on Darfur Contradiction, Palestine Flag and Pole, Syria Mechanism Letter Draft, 10 of 25 Inner City Press Questions Answered



By Matthew Russell Lee

UNITED NATIONS, August 28 -- Eleven days after the UN through its Spokesperson's Office refused to release a copy of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's speech to 150 bankers, calling it "private," the same UN has so far provided responses to ten of twenty-five questions submitted by Inner City Press. One answer, it seems, it contradicted from elsewhere in the UN system.

 On August 28 at 12:30 pm, Inner City Press submitted five questions, none of which were answered by 6:30 pm:

Aug 28 (1) On UNAMID, it is reported that "Ashraf Issa, spokesman of the UN peacekeeping mission, said in a press release last Monday that they never received any notification of flight restrictions in Darfur." Given previous answer, please clarify and state why this UNAMID "press release" was not sent out by unamid publicinformation like, for example, this one: "Cancellation of Press Briefing by African Union Peace and Security Council delegation in Khartoum "

Aug 28 (2) On the SG's letter he announced yesterday to the UNSC about the JIM mechanism on Syria chemical weapons, please explain why the draft response / approval letter is as submitted set to be signed by Joy Ogwu, who gives over presidency of the UNSC on August 31, less then five days from the SG's letter.

Aug 28 (3) Yesterday, Inner City Press was told in but not by the UN that if the draft resolution on raising the State of Palestine's flag at the UN passes, (1) it would go at the end of Member States, that is, nearest 42nd street and (2) that "the UN" has written a letter concerning its readiness to install the needed flagpole.

 I understand you will not comment on what may happen in the GA but I am requesting UN Secretariat (Protocol, OLA and/or DM/FMS) confirmation of where a non-member State's flag WOULD go, and on readiness to install the flagpole including that a letter to that effect has been written and sent.

Aug 28 (4) Please provide a summary of DPA's / USG Feltman's August 27 briefing to the UNSC about Burkina Faso, and specifically state whether it included the arson destruction of Radio Manegmoogo

Aug 28 (5) Please provide a summary of USG Nambiar's August 28 briefing to the UNSC about Myanmar, particularly but not only as regards the Rohingya / Rakhine State.

 Nor was any summary given was DPA's briefing on Burundi (although a belated answer to Inner City Press'questions earlier in the week was provided, and reported on this site, along with another answer about Somalia; see Mali, below.)

 On August 27, Inner City Press submitted five questions, two of them about South Sudan, one which Inner City Press had previewed the day before:

"August 27 (1) Please provide the comment and response of UNMISS, DPA and/or the Secretary General given his South Sudan statement yesterday to Salva Kiir's 12-page reservations, which we have published here:https://www.scribd.com/doc/276484376/On-South-Sudan-Salva-Kiir-s-12-Pages-of-Reservations-to-CPA

"August 27 (2) Relatedly on South Sudan, please (have UNMISS / DPKO) confirm or deny their knowledge of new fighting at Tayar port in Panyijiar county (Unity state)

"August 27 (3) Please state who from OIOS will be attending this in Manila:

'about 50 United Nations (UN) agencies, multilateral financial institutions, and inter-governmental organizations in a forum to discuss topics of common interests to the internal auditing profession. The RIAS 2015 will be held at the Asian Development Bank in Manila on 8 to 11 September 2015.'

and if any beyond IAD Director Eleanor Burns, please state the rationale including for the UN / public expenditure

"August 27 (4) UNIFEED in the past week circulated a video of DPKO USG Ladsous speaking about sexual abuse by peacekeepers, saying “leadership” must be held accountable, but taking no questions. The video appeared on the UN website, but has since been removed. Please state when the video was made, for what audience, and why it was removed from the UN Webcast website.

"August 27 (5) In Mali, please state MINUSMA's understanding of the situation in Anefis and what the UN intends to do."

This last August 27 question was answered, on August 28:

"On Mali, we are concerned by the impact of the recent cease-fire violations in Anefis on the peace process. Our efforts are currently geared towards a political resolution of this situation through dialogue. A "disengagement plan" is being discussed, which would see the parties return to their previous positions. We encourage all parties to accept this plan and focus their efforts on implementing the peace agreement. Meanwhile, MINUSMA is maintaining a robust posture to protect civilians and deter an escalation of the violence. The Mission maintains a 20 Km security perimeter around Kidal to protect civilians who could be threatened by new clashes."

  At  5 pm on August 27, responses to August 25 questions about Bring Back Our Girls and legionella were received, and a reiteration of the UN's read-outs of Ban in Paris with no mention of French troops' rapes in the Central African Republic.

 On August 26, Inner City Press submitted five questions, including of the type that would have had to be responded to at an in-person briefing: the UN being dissed by Yoweri Museveni, to whom Ban is deferring on Burundi, Ban's trip to Nigeria and Paris - did he raised rapes and Ladsous? - and UN Peacekeeping issues in DR Congo and Iraq. But 28 hours later, only a portion of one was answered:

  Here were the five questions Inner City Press submitted on August 26:

Aug 26 (1) At the signing in Juba, Uganda's President Museveni said that to invite the UN to your country is a vote of non-confidence in yourselves.The UN specializes in conserving terrorism. What is the UN system's response?

Aug 26 (2) Relatedly, what is the status of the SG naming an envoy to Burundi? Is the SG still deferring to President Museveni, now in light of the comments above made in Juba?

Aug 26 (3) On SG's trip: while in France, did the SG or his team raise to ANY French official the issue of the alleged sexual abuse of children in the Central African Republic by France's Sangaris peacekeepers? If so, to whom and what was said? While in Abuja, please confirm or deny that the SG received the petition from concerned citizens of Plateau State and attacks on villages there, and if confirm, state the SG's response. Same question again on letter from organizations of unpaid UN interns.

Aug 26 (4) On DRC, please state what steps the UN is taking to ensure that its cut off of aid to surrendered FDLR fighters will not result in attacks on civilians; please confirm that Taz Greyling, the chief of MONUSCO's demobilization, disarmament and reinsertion, said "We hope that FDLR will let them leave and have a chance at a normal life," and state the basis of that hope.

Aug 26 (5) Please state what UN DPKO is doing on Fiji's request that it expedite visa for Iraq for Fijian peacekeepers there.

 There was a sixth, about a(nother) UN junket, but it must wait to be asked until at least some answers arrive.

   On August 25, Inner City Press submitted five questions, one of which for the third time -- this one got a response, the only one of five August 25 noon briefings answerd on August 25:

 Here are other questions Inner City Press posed in writing to the UN Spokesperson's Office on August 25, not answered on August 25:

"Aug 25 (1) In South Sudan, what is the UN's response to MSF citing disease caused by lack of shelter and sanitation in the camps positioned within the United Nations base in Malakal? What is UNMISS and its UN partners doing? Also, please state UNMISS' and DPKO's awareness of an impending assault on Panyijjar county, Unity State...

"Aug 25 (3) Also on the Secretary General's trip, and the UN read-out for the SG's meeting with President Francois Hollande, please explain what the SG meant by his "commitment in addressing issues of misconduct, including sexual exploitation and abuse, by UN peacekeepers,” including as regards the USG for Peacekeeping Mr Herve Ladsous, and explain why sexual abuse by French “peacekeepers” in the Sangaris force was not mentioned or included in the UN read-out.

Here is a question answered on August 24:

Q Aug 24 (1) In Sudan, it is reported that North Darfur authorities banned UNAMID flights. Please confirm or deny this, when it happened and the UN's understanding of why, and the UN's response.

Answer: "On 22 August, the Government of Sudan denied authorization for UNAMID flights to and from El Fasher, North Darfur, with the exception of one flight from Khartoum. Media reports thereafter alleged that this decision followed accusations by North Darfur authorities that UNAMID did not adequately coordinate the visit of the African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) with them, on 21 and 22 August. 

"UNAMID rejects these allegations and confirms that the Government of Sudan, including the authorities in North Darfur, was fully involved in preparing, coordinating and participating in the AUPSC visit to Darfur."

  While appreciated, what was the impact of banning flights to and from North Darfur? The UN answered Inner City Press' follow up question on the status of the Ban by saying its "understanding is that the flights are running now."

  Since then, UNAMID has told local media that there was no hinderance of flights. Is this covering up, like UN Peacekeeping under Herve Ladsous did on rapes in Tabit in Darfur, and in Minova in DR Congo before that?

 Here are the four other August 24 questions, two responded to on August 25, the other two still unanswered:

Aug 24 (2) In Somalia, now that AMISOM (which is supported by UNSOA) has admitted killing civilians at Merka (or Marka) in late July, what is the UN's response and how will the UN human rights due diligence policy be implemented?

[Inner City Press on August 25 asked UK Ambassador Matthew Rycroft about this; we hope to have more.]

Aug 24 (3) While in France, does the Secretary General or his team intend to inquire into the belated French investigation into the child sexual abuse alleged against French Sangaris forces in the Central African Republic?

Aug 24 (4) In DRC, it is reported that in Kinshasa earlier this month the authorities rounded up copies of the C-News newspaper (censorship) and that in July the director of Full Contact Radio station broadcasting in Kananga was taken into custody after a broadcast alleging governmental dysfunctions... In Uvira, in South Kivu province, in August 2015, there was the arrest of Brinal Nundun, a journalist from Channel 7 TV, who was reporting on Burundian refugees in Uvira at the headquarters of the NGO "Action Ku  Sidon." His equipment was seized. What is the UN, DPKO or MONUSCO response to this?

 On August 25 at 5 pm, this UN response was received: "On your question on the DRC: MONUSCO continues to monitor closely the human rights situation in the DRC, including the situation with regard to  journalists. Using its good offices to facilitate an environment conducive to a peaceful electoral process, the Mission continues to encourage the Government to uphold fundamental freedoms, including freedom of speech and freedom of the press. For example, the advocacy efforts of the Mission contributed recently to the release of a journalist who was in police custody in Uvira territory, South Kivu."

Aug 24 (5) It is said that Burundi police or security forces are to be deployed to MINUSMA in Mali. Please confirm or deny, and if confirm, state what screening would be in place given recent events in Burundi. Also, what is the UN's response to Amnesty International's report of Burundi security forces using torture?

  On August 25 at 5 pm the response below was received, and Inner City Press separately reported it as well:

"On your question on Burundi: There are currently no Military troops from Burundi in the UN mission in Mali (MINUSMA). As of 31 July, there were 14 Police officers from Burundi serving as individual police officers in MINUSMA police component. No deployment of Burundi police officers to MINUSMA is planned for the foreseeable future. Following reports alleging human rights abuses on the part of some elements of the Burundian police, a decision has been taken to suspend the deployment of Burundian police officers to peacekeeping missions."

   A follow up has been asked.

Update: on August 26, Inner City Press told Inner City Press, "On the 14 Burundian police officers, they will be rotated out of MINUSMA in the coming months according to the end of their respective terms (this rotation will be completed by March 2016)."
 
  With the UN embroiled in rape scandals, exposed as playing host to spying for the US National Security Agency while its Secretary General Ban Ki-moon gave a speech to 150 bankers later deemed “private,” is this dysfunction a product of the press not wanting answers or the UN not wanting to give them?

  On August 17, Inner City Press asked the UN's spokesperson for the day, Vannina Maestracci, about UN rapes in the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo before it, about the spying for the NSA and about Ban's speech on August 14 to 150 people at the Buffalo headquarters of M&T Bank, subject to government charges on unfair lending and on money laundering. Video here.

   UN Associate Spokesperson Maestracci began by saying that the UN's contracts with AT&T, which turned over all information to the US, would not be made public. From the UN transcript:
Inner City Press: Would it be fair to assume that UN contractors paid by the UN are assumed not to be spying on people inside the UN?

Associate Spokesperson Maestracci:  I don't know what the procurement contract entails, and I don't like assuming as a general rule.  Oleg.

Inner City Press:  Can we get a copy of the contract?

Associate Spokesperson Maestracci:  I doubt it.  Oleg.

 Inner City Press has since researched this and found a UN written policy militating for release of the contracts. Former UN Office of Internal Oversight Services chiefInga Britt Ahlenius, when she left, wrote to Ban that “I see no visible effort to deliver on your stated commitment to increased transparency.”

   Next on the UN rapes in CAR, on which Maestracci had read out a statement that UNICEF was providing the victim legal advice, Inner City Press asked

Inner City Press: You read out on UNICEF that they purport to be providing legal advice to the victim.  And I guess I just wonder, given that the… that the legal problem is caused by the UN system's own invocation of immunity, what advice are they giving, to sue those responsible or… it just seems like… isn't it kind of a conflict for the UN system to be the one providing, purporting to provide legal advice to a person victimized by the UN system who can't get justice because of UN immunity.  So, what's the advice, I guess I'm saying…?

Associate Spokesperson:  I'm not sure what the advice is because I'm here, not with UNICEF in the [Central African Republic], but I think they are showing all the possible avenues that she has and what she can do.  I mean, I think it's fairly… people might not know what these avenues are.  And it's important…

Inner City Press:  Can she sue UN?

Associate Spokesperson:  Can I speak?  And it's important for people to raise awareness and to make sure that they do know where to go.

Inner City Press: Where should she go?  I mean, I'm just saying it seems… it's a contradiction because if she tries to sue…
Associate Spokesperson:  And where…

Inner City Press:  …she's told that it's immune, that the UN is immune.

Associate Spokesperson:  That's not true.  There's an investigation going on.  And that, you know, it is going on.  Why don't we let it go on and see what it comes up with?

Inner City Press:  That's the second question I wanted to ask.
Associate Spokesperson:  You are so not interested in the answers.

Inner City Press: Yeah, I am interested. I wasn't getting an answer.  That's the problem.

Associate Spokesperson:  Erol, please.

 Vine here.

   So, for the second time Maestracci cut off the question, this time with the statement, “You are so not interested in the answers.” But even when Inner City Press emailed questions after the briefing to Maestracci and Ban's lead spokesman, no answers were received. This is today's UN.

  Further on the UN rapes, now in the DRC Congo, Inner City Press asked:

Inner City Press: Just for the record, the answer I was asking for is what legal advice UNICEF gave.  But, I hear… since you said to wait, I wanted to ask you this.  In 2012… I don't know if it was in this room or a previous UN briefing room… there was discussion of the rape of two girls in the DRC [Democratic Republic of the Congo] by three… they believe they're from Uruguay but three peacekeepers in the DRC.  This was alleged by Dr. Victoria Fontan of the UN University of Peace in Costa Rica.  It was said there would be an investigation, but nothing has ever been said of either the peacekeepers being held responsible or the SRSG [Special Representative of the Secretary-General] of the Mission at the time or DPKO [Department of Peacekeeping Operations].  So, I wanted to know… I'm asking you, I don't expect you necessarily to know from the podium, but this is an answer I'm extremely interested in — what happened?

Associate Spokesperson:  I don't know about the specific case obviously from 2012.  But, I think you've heard what the Secretary-General has been saying all of last week and what he's, what he's been pushing when it comes to both misconduct and… including… sorry, misconduct including sexual exploitation and abuse.  I mean, he's been very strong.  He has shown his resolve to push this forward and to make sure that there is, you know, institutional accountability, responsibility, but also that Member States provide us with the information that we ask because, as you know, there is a limit, some things are up to Member States.  But, obviously, he's very determined to make progress in this, in this area for the victims of misconduct.

Inner City Press:  But, what happened in this case?

Associate Spokesperson:  I don't know.  I just said that.
Inner City Press: I'm asking, can you ask DPKO?  The two victims’ names were Gisele and Esperanz…

Associate Spokesperson:  Sure.  Why don't you send me an e-mail rather than saying everything here.  Oleg.

   Another cut off. And to the detailed email sent after the briefing, no answer at all. This is today's or Ban's UN. Here was the final exchange of the day, about Ban Ki-moon's speech to bankers:

Inner City Press: there was an article in The Buffalo News saying that the Secretary-General had gone to Buffalo and given a speech in front of 150 people in the M&T Bank headquarters for a couple of reasons.  One… I'm interested because M&T Bank has a bank merger that's been stalled out for three years due to allegations of money-laundering and lending discrimination, but mostly I wanted to know, did he give such a speech?  Can we get the text of the speech?  Why wasn't it given in advance?  And did he raise these issues about lending fairness and money laundering in his discussions with the CEO of the bank?

Associate Spokesperson:  So this was mainly a private visit.  He went to visit Buffalo and Niagara Falls, actually, and he was invited by someone he's known for a long time to address this… this group of people that you've mentioned.  We didn't put it out, again, because it was mostly, mainly, largely, a private visit.  He was with his family over the weekend.

Inner City Press: Were the people there all employees of the bank?  Was…

Associate Spokesperson:  No, I think it was community leaders from all over Buffalo, if I understand correctly.

Inner City Press: Do you have the remarks?

Associate Spokesperson:  I'll check, but, again:  mainly private visit and I don't think we'd be sharing them.  Anything else?  Great.  Have a good afternoon.

   No answers. This is today's or Ban's UN, UNtransparent and worse - and the Free UN Coalition for Access opposes it. Watch this site.

 
  

In Somalia, After Merka Deaths Admitted by African Union, UN Tells Inner City Press that Nicholas Kay Is On It


By Matthew Russell Lee
UNITED NATIONS, August 28 -- After the African Union acknowledged that Ugandan troops in AMISOM executed civilians at a wedding in Merka in late July, Inner City Press asked the UN (on August 24) and Ambassador Matthew Rycroft of the UK, what will the UN Security Council which authorized AMISOM, and UN Peacekeeping which supports it, do?
  On August 28, in response to Inner City Press' question to Ambassador Rycroft, the UK Mission to the UN told Inner City Press:
"You asked about a recent AMISOM incident. We are aware of reports of civilian deaths in recent AMISOM operations. This is a very serious allegation. The AU has apologised and is investigating, including through recalling the local AMISOM commander for questioning.

"The AU now needs to follow up and ensure accountability.

 "Incidents like this underline the need for AMISOM to improve protection of civilians in operations. The Security Council has repeatedly called for a civilian casualty response cell in AMISOM. The UK is taking forward discussions with the AU to get a cell established as soon as possible."
  The UK answer was appreciated, and was followed later on August 28 by the UN spokesperson's office answer, after four days, to Inner City Press' August 24 question:
Aug 24 ICP Q: "In Somalia, now that AMISOM (which is supported by UNSOA) has admitted killing civilians at Merka (or Marka) in late July, what is the UN's response and how will the UN human rights due diligence policy be implemented?"
Aug 28 UN answer: "On Somalia, the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) sent an investigation team to Merka in late July and is coordinating with AMISOM on their ongoing independent investigation. UNSOM’s UN Human Rights Due Diligence Policy (HRDDP) task force has met in Mogadishu to discuss findings and actions taken by AMISOM and recommendations from the meeting are currently under internal review. The UN calls for the expedited investigation of alleged cases of unlawful deaths, injuries and human rights violations and UN support to partners is based on the condition of compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law. The UN welcomes the decisions of both the Government of Somalia and the Interim South West Administration (ISWA) to establish committees to investigate these incidents. The Secretary-General's Special Representative Nicholas Kay has held meetings with his AMISOM counterpart, the Force Commander, and the relevant contingent Commander to press for an investigation, accountability and corrective measures."
 We'll stay on this.
 Back on July 28 when the UN Security Council adopted a Somalia resolution days after allegations of reprisal killings by AMISOM in Marka, Inner City Press asked UK Ambassador Rycroft:
Inner City Press: On Somalia, there are a lot of Al Shabaab attacks, there have also been some recent allegations of a reprisal attack by AMISOM. And the UN said they asked the African Union. But given the increasing support in relation with the UN, what should be done to help the African Union forces don’t commit abuses while fighting Al Shabaab?

Amb Rycroft: "So the very clear message from this resolution is first of all that AMISOM does need to get stronger in its robust response to some attacks. But it does need to do so in a way that has absolute clarity about command and control. And we’re looking to see that improve through the mission statement in this resolution.

"And in terms of allegation of any inappropriate behaviour by any members of AMISOM, or the other UN peacekeeping operations, all of those allegations need to be followed up rapidly and robustly, and we are putting in place through this resolution and through the work that the African Union has done, measures that will allow the African Union to get a tighter grip on these sorts of allegations."
  But what does this "grip" mean? What implications does this have under the UN's supposed Human Rights Due Diligence Policy?
  Now  AU envoy and AMISOM head Sidokou has admitted the killings of civilians had taken place. “We have established that, on that occasion, seven civilians died following an incident involving our troops,” Sidokou said in a statement issued in Kenya.
  The UNSC resolution itself, while "welcoming the AU's investigation of allegations of sexual violence allegedly perpetrated by some AMISOM troops," expresses "its disappointment that the AU did not receive full cooperation from all AMISOM troop contributing countries in carrying out its investigation, and calling on the AU and troop contributing countries to ensure that allegations are properly investigated and appropriate follow-up action is taken."
 We'll see.

Back on May 8 when the UN's outgoing humanitarian coordinator for Somalia Philippe Lazzarini held a press conference, Inner City Press asked him about the impact of money transfer and remittance being cut off, about the future of the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya -- and about Puntland and Somaliland, where people fleeing Yemen are landing.Video here.
  Lazzarini said that remittances have been cut from the UK, US, Australia and more recently Kenya; the latter country might reinstate some of the money transfer companies, he said. Returns to Somalia from Dadaab should be voluntary.  
  In response to Inner City Press' question about the involvement of some parts of the UN, and of the International Organization for Migration in screening refugees including for “counter-terrorism,” Lazzarini said that the government of Somalia is concerned about returnees who might have joined certain groups while in Yemen. Can you say, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula? There is more transparency needed, however, particularly from IOM.
  Lazzarini has previously answered Inner City Press about Somaliland's airspace. On May 8 when Inner City Press asked about the UN's dealings with Somaliland and Puntland, he said it is a big topic, but concretely the deadly attack on UNICEF in Puntland means one can no longer say Puntland more safe than, say, Mogadishu. But what about Somaliland? We will have more on this.

  Lazzarini is headed next to Lebanon; we'll continue to cover his and the UN's work there, and wish him luck.

 
  

On Burundi, Ban Ki-moon HStill as Not Named a New UN Envoy, Belated Update Given to Inner City Press: Talks with Ugandans


By Matthew Russell Lee
UNITED NATIONS, August 28-- As in Burundi the crackdown on those opposing or even questioning the third term for Pierre Nkurunziza continues, the UN has yet to name a replacement for its last envoy Bathily, rejected by Pierre Nkurunziza. After 5 pm on Friday, August 28, the UN responded to Inner City Press' repeated questions, below.
Earlier on August 28, after a closed-door Security Council session about Burundi, Inner City Press asked Alexis Lamek as Deputy Permanent Representative of France, the Security Council's penholder on Burundi, what had come out of the meeting.
  Lamek told Inner City Press, "We discussed the issue, let's see, we seek close contact with the Burundians, to accompany the process...".
Inner City Press asked, "Any talk of the new UN Envoy?"
  Lamek told Inner City Press, "It's in the air."
 Then he found the door from the Security Council closed - metaphorically or not. We appreciated his answer. But an envoy was called imminent more than two weeks ago, and such quiet Security Council meetings may not help.
  Later on August 28, in response to Inner City Press' questions, Ban's spokesperson's office sent this to Inner City Press:
"On Burundi, consultations are still ongoing with Burundian authorities and relevant member states on the potential appointment of a high-level representative to assist in the ongoing regional efforts on Burundi, including on what assistance would be most appropriate. The Secretary-General spoke to President Museveni and AU Chairperson Zuma in a joint teleconference on 3 August where they all agreed to work together to find a solution to the political crisis in Burundi.  During the teleconference, he offered United Nations support  to the sub-regional initiative, which has also been encouraged by the members of the Security Council.  The Secretariat has been exchanging views with Ugandan authorities on how best the UN could assist."
 Note that after Ban's August 3 conversation with Museveni, in Juba Museveni advised Salva Kiir to get the UN out of his country, saying it preserves terrorism. Still, no UN envoy to Burundi.
On August 24, Inner City Press asked the UN in writing: "It is said that Burundi police or security forces are to be deployed to MINUSMA in Mali. Please confirm or deny, and if confirm, state what screening would be in place given recent events in Burundi. Also, what is the UN's response to Amnesty International's report of Burundi security forces using torture?" More than a day passed before an answer, see below.
  At 5 pm on August 25 came this UN response: "There are currently no Military troops from Burundi in the UN mission in Mali (MINUSMA). As of 31 July, there were 14 Police officers from Burundi serving as individual police officers in MINUSMA police component. No deployment of Burundi police officers to MINUSMA is planned for the foreseeable future. Following reports alleging human rights abuses on the part of some elements of the Burundian police, a decision has been taken to suspend the deployment of Burundian police officers to peacekeeping missions."
  While appreciated, if deployment has been "suspended," are the 14 Burundian police still in Mali? If so, for how long?
Update: Inner City Press asked, and on August 26 the UN told Inner City Press, "On the 14 Burundian police officers, they will be rotated out of MINUSMA in the coming months according to the end of their respective terms (this rotation will be completed by March 2016)."
 On August 20, Inner City Press asked the UN if any of its officials attended Nkurunziza's inauguration. Yes, it was told, from the UN Country Team.
 On August 21, Inner City Press asked morevideo here:
Inner City Press: In Burundi, tomorrow is the funeral of the general that was assassinated.  Many people are saying it could be a very dangerous time, given the youth wing of the ruling party, etc.  Is it true that the UN has told its personnel in Burundi not to go downtown tomorrow?  And, two, where does it stand on the envoy that was said to be imminent some 10 days ago?

Associate Spokesperson Eri Kaneko:  On security arrangements, as you know, we can’t talk about that, but on any potential envoy from the UN side, we remain in close contact with the Burundian authorities, Security Council members, as well as regional and subregional organizations to ensure that the best possible support will be provided to the political dialogue process in Burundi.

Anybody else?  Okay.  Let’s have a great weekend.  And barring any major event, we will see you the week after next. 
  Ah, urgency.
 On August 19, Inner City Press asked the UN about the new report by Radio Publique Africaine, which was the target of pro-Nkurunziza attacks early in the process, linking the government itself with the killing of its General. 
 Inner City Press asked not only for the UN's view, but how this media under threat, RPA, might be protected. The UN merely "referred back" to Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's previously, now superseded, statement. From the UN's August 19 transcript:
Inner City Press In Burundi, one of the media that was closed by the Government, RPA, Radio Publique Africaine, has published its publication of who killed the general that the Secretary-General denounced the assassination of.  Their investigation was pretty detailed, seems to say that it leads… the tracks lead back to the Government itself.  So, I wanted to know—

Associate Spokesperson Vannina Maestracci:  I’ll just refer you back to his statement at that moment and his alarm at the trend of politically motivated violence that we’re seeing in Burundi.

Inner City Press:  But is the UN's Department of Political Affairs DPA tracking, I guess, these… it’s this… this report, one, if true, would be a pretty big thing and also seems to put the media at risk.  So I wanted to know, who in the UN system is sort of tracking these events?

Associate Spokesperson:  We have a presence in Burundi, a UN presence, as you know, and, of course, DPA is looking at, you know, the relevant offices in DPA look at the political developments of, all over the world, Matthew. 
  In this same briefing UN spokesperson Maestracci told Inner City Press, "This is not your briefing;" earlier she said Inner City Press should just send in emails rather than say things in the briefing room and that Inner City Press is "so not interested in the answers."  That Vine here. 
  On August 13 Inner City Press again asked UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman about the promised envoy, and about torture and threats on other human rights defenders and even former UN peacekeepers. From the UN's August 13 transcript:
Inner City Press: there’s reports from Burundi that Richard Hagabimana, a military official, I guess, viewed as being anti-Nkurunziza, is not only in detention but is being tortured.  Given that he was a UN peacekeeper, I’m wondering whether the UN there in… in… in Bujumbura or otherwise is aware of that and also of threats against a second human rights defender, Mr. [inaudible] [ICP: it was Anschaire Nikoyagize], who has gone to…

Spokesman Stephane Dujarric:  I haven’t seen those particular reports.  We can look into them.  Obviously, we’ve spoken out pretty strongly on these issues in the past.

Inner City Press:  Where does it stand on an envoy which was called imminent two days ago?

Spokesman:  When there is an update, I will share it with you.
Nothing. The president of the Security Council for August, Nigeria's Joy Ogwu, answered Inner City Press late on August 10 after a closed door briefing by Ivan Simonovic (see below, including possibility of ICC investigation or prosecution)  that the naming of an envoy is "imminent," to maintain "momentum." 
  On August 11, Inner City Press asked Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Stephane Dujarric about it, video heretranscript here:
Inner City Press: The President of the Council yesterday called the naming of this envoy to Burundi imminent in order to keep the momentum going, which would seem to… probably come from Tayé Brook Zerihoun.  Does the Secretary-General feel the same imminence and…?

Spokesman Dujarric:  Yes, I think…  We can debate on the meaning of words.  I would say imminent would probably not be a bad choice of words.
  Well placed sources exclusively told Inner City Press that the threat is, if any sanctions are imposed, to pull Burundi's peacekeepers from the UN Mission in the Central African Republic, and from the AU mission in Somalia.
  This type of linkage has worked before with Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, for example in the case of Bangladesh, with Inner City Press also closely covered.
  Earlier on August 10, Inner City Press asked UN Spokesman Stephane Dujarric about the crackdown including police abductions in the Jabe neighborhood of Bujumbura, when Secretary General Ban Ki-moon will name and send a new envoy and what Ban would like to see out of the Security Council meeting scheduled for the afternoon of August 10.Video here.
  Dujarric had no update on an envoy; Pressed, he said that the UN has a central office in Bujumbura which victims could contact. 

There are names of the abducted, and photographs. We'll have more on this.
 On August 7, Inner City Press asked US Ambassador Samantha Power, at the end of a question and answer stakeout, if the UN should name a new envoy to Burundi. Video here. Power paused and replied, "I'm sure they will, I expect them to."

  Minutes later at the UN noon briefing, Inner City Press asked UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric, "Are there any moves afoot to do this?"

Spokesman Dujarric:  "I think we alluded to foots and moves.  An announcement will be made in due course when we are ready to make that announcement.  Obviously, you know, we have gone through, to speak plainly, I think we have gone through a number of facilitators and envoys in Burundi.  I think we just need to make sure that whenever an envoy is named he or she has the support, at least the promise of support from all parties.  It’s a critical, critical situation.  I mean, we are seeing the situation in Burundi on a tinder box.  So when we have something to announce, we shall."
 Back on August 6 at the UN noon briefing, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Stephane Dujarric disclosed that the previous day, Ban had spoken with Nkurunziza. Inner City Press immediately asked if Ban had raised to Nkurunziza the prospect of a new UN envoy or person to lead up the UN's work; Dujarric would not answer this.Video hereAudio here
  For the UN Burundi is handled by the African I Division of the UN Department of Political Affairs; Inner City Press asked Dujarric about its scoop, that the outgoing president of the UN General Assembly Sam Kutesa, still the foreign minister of Uganda, has asked Ban's chef de cabinet Susana Malcorra to put his chief of staff, Arthur Kafeero, atop UN Africa 1. Dujarric would not even describe the status of recruitment.  Audio here.  
Video here. We'll have more on this.
 On August 5, Inner City Press asked UN spokesman Stephen Dujarric:
Inner City Press: In Burundi, the Government there has put out a statement saying that they are now armed groups disguised as the military as official Government soldiers.  Apparently, I guess, they are basically trying to say that when you see a Government soldier kill somebody it might not be a Government soldier, it might be an armed group disguised.  So I wanted to… things seem to further deteriorating and I wanted to know, what… yesterday it was said there might be some UN individual named to deal with it, what are the steps being taken given what is happening?

Spokesman Dujarric:  Obviously, I think the Secretary-General and his colleagues, political and others are keeping a very close eye on the situation.  We are getting reports from our… from the human rights offices there.  I think we are obviously very concerned about the possibility of a quick spiralling, negative spiraling of the situation in Burundi.  It’s incumbent on the Government to ensure that whatever security operations are taken are taken with full respect to human rights law, to international humanitarian, international humanitarian law.  We’ve already expressed our concern of the treatment of the media.  I think what we are seeing just underscores the need for the political dialogue to resume and to put Burundi back on the right track.

Inner City Press:  Can you say anything more of the idea of a person to lead [the UN's work on Burundi]?

Spokesman Dujarric:  No.  I think Farhan spoke about it yesterday.  I have nothing else to add.
  Later on August 5, the UN Peacebuilding Configuration on Burundi issued this statement -- but a replacement of the UN's Bathily, rejected by Nkurunziza, remains UNnamed:
"The PBC Burundi Configuration strongly condemns the assassination on 2 August 2015 of General Adolphe Nshimirimana, former head of the National Intelligence Service, and in Charge of Special Missions at State House.

The PBC Burundi Configuration is concerned about the deterioration of the security environment marked by reported violence and violations of human rights.

The PBC Burundi Configuration notes with great concern the attack on 3 August against Pierre Claver Mbonimpa, president of «Association pour la protection des droits humains et des personnes détenues» and respected human rights defender.

The PBC Burundi Configuration calls on all Burundians to exercise restraint in order to prevent a further escalation of violence.

The PBC Burundi Configuration calls on the Government and political actors to urgently resume dialogue, and on all Burundians to establish the necessary conditions for rebuilding trust and fostering national unity.

The PBC Burundi Configuration reiterates its support to regional and international initiatives aimed at supporting Burundi to re-engage in dialogue."
  So when WILL the UN at least name a replacement for Bathily?
 On August 4, Inner City Press asked incoming President of the UN Security Council for August, Ambassador Joy Ogwu of Nigeria, what to expect on Burundi during the month. She said the space has been left in the Security Council's program of work for such emergencies.
  At the August 4 noon briefing, Inner City Press asked UN deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq about the mediation in Burundi; he replied that the UN hopes in the near future to announce someone to lead the UN's work on Burundi.  Video here. When?
  Inner City Press asked Deputy Permanent Representative Alexis Lamik of France, the Council's "penholder" on Burundi, whether any meeting has been scheduled. Not at this stage, he said.
  Later on August 4, the Security Council issued this statement:
"The members of the Security Council strongly condemned the killing of General Adolphe Nshimirimana on 2 August and the violent attack on Pierre Claver Mbonimpa on 3 August. They noted that there is no place for violence and called on all actors to remain calm.

"The members of the Security Council expressed concern that the security situation in Burundi is deteriorating rapidly, following an electoral period marked by violence and reports of violations and abuses of human rights.

"The members of the Security Council appealed to the government of Burundi, as well as all political actors, to resume an inclusive dialogue without delay. To this end, they reaffirmed their support for regional engagement, in particular by the East African Community and the African Union, in calling for restraint and in pursuit of a political resolution to the crisis. The members of the Security Council remained committed to supporting long term peace and stability in Burundi."

 Back on August 3, Inner City Press asked UN Secreaty General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Stephane Dujarric about Nkurunziza's security forces beating and torturing journalist Esdras Ndikumana. Video here.
  Ban's spokesman said the UN was aware. But why wasn't it included in Ban's statement that day praising Nkurunziza? 
On August 4, Inner City Press asked Ban's deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq about the future of the MENUB mission, if the UN had visited Mbonimpa or tried to ensure protection for his family, and about the status of any mediation.
  While it appears that no UN visit to Mbonimpa has been made, Haq in his answer to Inner City Press say that the UN will "hopefully sometime in the near future announce someone who can lead the UN efforts on Burundi."
  The questions came rolling in, to Inner City Press and presumably to the UN: who? When? Could the third time, after Said Djinnit then Bathily, be the charm? We'll have more on this.
 On August 3, the UN put out this "read-out" of Ban's work on Burundi:
"The Secretary-General held a conference call today with H.E. Mr. Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, President of the Republic of Uganda, and H.E. Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, Chairperson of the African Union Commission, to discuss the situation in Burundi.

The Secretary-General reiterated his strong condemnation of the killing, this weekend, of General Adolphe Nshimirimana and expressed his concern over its implications for security in Burundi. He expressed his full support for President Museveni’s efforts to facilitate an inclusive political dialogue in Burundi on behalf of the East African Community.

The Secretary-General called for the swift resumption of the dialogue to defuse mounting tensions and pave the way for the formation of a government of national unity. It was agreed that the United Nations, the East African Community and the African Union should continue working closely together in a coordinated and unified approach to find a sustainable solution to the crisis in Burundi."
  We'll stay on this.

Here was Ban's belated statement:
"The Secretary-General notes with great concern the continuing deterioration of the security environment in Burundi following an electoral period marked by violence and the violation of human rights, including the right to life.

"In this context, the Secretary-General strongly condemns the killing of General Adolphe Nshimirimana on 2 August. He welcomes President Nkurunziza's message to the nation to remain calm and to the competent authorities to expeditiously investigate this assassination in order to bring the perpetrators to justice. He calls on the Burundian authorities to investigate diligently other recent political assassinations.

"The Secretary-General renews his appeal to all Burundians to resume an inclusive dialogue without delay and peacefully settle their differences under the facilitation of President Museveni as mandated by the East African Community. The Secretary-General remains committed to supporting peace consolidation and conflict prevention efforts in Burundi."
 After Dujarric read out the belated statement, Inner City Press asked about government security beating journalist Esdras Ndikumana. Dujarric indicated that the UN system is aware. But why then was it not in Ban's statement praising Nkurunziza? It's like Ban calling the elections "broadly peaceful."
With Ban slated to be in the UN press briefing room less than an hour later, Inner City Press for the Free UN Coalition for Access asked why Ban would not taken even a single question. Video herePeriscope here. That question remains, and will be pursued.
  The US State Department statement, calling for restraint, said:
"The United States condemns the murder of General Adolphe Nshimirimana in Bujumbura today and urges calm and restraint in the aftermath of the attack.  We call on all sides to renounce violence and to redouble their efforts to engage in a transparent, inclusive, and comprehensive political dialogue.  

"The path forward must address foundational issues, including respect for human rights, freedom of the press and other fundamental freedoms, and respect for the Arusha Agreement and its power-sharing provisions.  Restoration of dialogue is urgent, and all parties must work together in pursuit of a consensus, peaceful path forward for the people of Burundi."
  But where was Ban Ki-moon? He was not at the UN on August 2 with many countries' Permanent Representatives, working on and agreeing to a post-2015 development agenda text. But he quickly issued a statement on that, and seemed sure to brag about it with US President Barack Obama on August 4. But still silent on Burundi.
 After the government refused to attend the East African Community mediation sessions, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on July 23 blithely "took note" of what he called the "broadly peaceful conduct of polling." 
 On July 28 the UN Security Council belatedly held closed door consultations about Burundi, the Council's first meeting on the country since July 9. Before the meeting ended, the Ambassador of France, the penholder of the Council on Burundi, had left. While the session was closed, afterward Inner City Press asked participants both on and off the record what was said. 
  Inner City Press on background was told that the idea of a shortened third term for Nkurunziza had been raised in the meeting. On the record, at the UN Television stakeout, Inner City Press asked the Council's president for July Gerard von Bohemen of New Zealand if this had arisen. 
 From the New Zealand mission's transcription:
Inner City Press: Burundi, I wanted to ask you whether there was any discussion of a government of national unity and in connection with that a possible short third term?
A: There was a strong support for the idea of a government of national unity. It’s recognised that there isn’t consensus as to what that might mean. There was reference by the Assistant-Secretary-General that for some that means a shorter third term but it’s not clear that that’s an accepted parameter for anybody at this stage.
  On July 27, Inner City Press attended - after an initial request to keep it out - the UN Peacebuilding Configuration meeting on Burundi, then went and asked UN Spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press:  On Burundi, I wanted to ask, there was a peacebuilding configuration meeting in Conference Room 5 and the representative of, I guess, the UN’s Human Rights Office said there is now, since 22 July, six AU [African Union] human rights monitors in the country, but the UN has no contact with them, because the Government hasn't somehow permitted it.  I wanted to know, one, is it the UN system they can't… I heard you from in podium say repeatedly how the UN works with the AU, likes the AU, the AU is going to solve it, why would it be the UN can't contact the human rights monitors of the AU?  And does Ban Ki-moon acknowledge that there is some… his statement about broadly peaceful is inconsistent as perceived with the MENUB report just out this hour?

Spokesman Dujarric:  No, I don't think it's inconsistent.  In fact, I think the MENUB report does talk about, you know, that the election day was relatively peaceful and conducted adequately.  However, as MENUB says, the overall environment was not conducive for a free and fair, credible election process.  So there, I don't agree with your compare and contrast exercise.  On the AU monitors, this is the first I've heard of it.  I can check.
  While seven hours later no information was provided, Inner City Press at 4:30 pm on July 27 asked the President of the UN Security Council for July, Gerard von Bohemen of New Zealand, if finally there would be a Security Council meeting on Burundi (the first since July 9), now that the MENUB report was out. Yes, he said, there'd be consultations on July 28 at 3 pm.
  The briefers will be Department of Political Affairs official Taye-Brook Zerihoun and MENUB Officer in Charge Issaka Souna, by video from Bujumbura. We'll be there.
  Inner City Press on July 23 asked one of Ban's Associate Spokespeople Vannina Maestracci on what basis Ban "noted" as he did a "peaceful conduct of polling," while she continued to say wait for the UN's MENUB mission's report. Video here. She said she would not "dissect every word" of Ban's statement. How about one word: peaceful?
   On July 24, after Nkurunziza was declared the winner and the East African Community said it was neither free nor fair, Inner City Press asked another UN spokesperson at the day's noon briefing what Ban had meant by "broadly peaceful," in light of the EAC finding and for example an Amnesty International report on abuses.
 This spokesperson said that given Ban's previously warnings of violence, he had been "relatively speaking" by saying things were peaceful. Video here. 


Finally Inner City Press asked where Ban is, "taking note." Ban is "away from the office," while his Public Schedule continues to say "all appointments are internal."
 The day before on July 22 Inner City Press at the UN noon briefing asked the UN what it was doing:
Inner City Press: yesterday, I'd asked Farhan about these reports of at least two deaths during the voting, and he said that the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) had these four monitoring teams out.  I understand it takes them a few days to put together their electoral assessment.  But, does that side of the UN have anything to say about actual physical violence directed at those voting or not voting?

Associate Spokesperson Vannina Maestracci: Nothing from the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights right now… but you're right, they do have four teams on the ground, regional teams that are mobile.  And as soon as we hear back from them and from MENUB, from the Electoral Mission, we will let you know. 
  While still waiting, Ban Ki-moon on July 23 issued this statement:
"The Secretary-General takes note of the broadly peaceful conduct of polling in the Burundian presidential elections on 21 July. He calls on all parties to continue to remain calm and immediately resume an inclusive political dialogue to resolve their differences and address the challenges facing the country.

"The Secretary-General reminds the Burundian authorities of their responsibility to guarantee and protect the safety and security of the civilian population and ensure an end to further acts of violence as well as accountability for any human rights violations committed.

"The Secretary-General calls on the Burundian parties to engage in good faith in the political dialogue putting Burundi’s national interests first and fully determined to implement the relevant outstanding provisions of the 6 July East African Community (EAC) summit outcome document, under the high-level facilitation of President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda. The United Nations remains committed to working closely with the EAC and African Union (AU) to help find a lasting solution in Burundi.

"In this regard, the Secretary-General welcomes the deployment of AU human rights observers and military experts aimed at helping prevent an escalation of violence and facilitating a peaceful resolution of the serious political crisis affecting Burundi."
  UNrelevant.
  Also on July 22, Inner City Press asked Ambassador Francois Delattre of France, the "penholder" in the UN Security Council on Burundi, if there would be a briefing about the situation there. "I will think about that," he said. (Inner City Press asked again on July 23 and got a laugh, perhaps out of politeness.)
 Later on July 22, Inner City Press asked the Security Council's president for July, Ambassador Gerard von Bohemen of New Zealand, if there would be a briefing on Burundi, from MENUB. From the NZ UN transcript:
Inner City Press: About Burundi, now that this election took place, some people were killed during it, is there going to be any kind of Council briefing or to hear from MENUB their review of it?
A: So we’re waiting to hear back from MENUB so then we’ll be in a better position to make a decision about when next to discuss the issue.
On June 21 Inner City Press asked the Deputy Spokesperson, video heretranscript here
Inner City Press: in Burundi, there are reports of a number of deaths that have taken place during the day's polling, and I'm wondering, is that something that the UN, either the human rights side or MENUB, can confirm at this time before they issue a written report?

Deputy Spokesman Farhan Haq:  I don't have any details to share on that.  You've seen the reports, as we all have done.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights Office also has staff from four regional offices deployed from Bujumbura, among which are two mobile teams who are working closely with security staff and the UN Electoral Observation Mission.  And as I said before you got in, we have teams from the Mission, MENUB, deployed to all of the country’s 18 provinces, and there's a total of 21 teams of 3 observers each being deployed.

 Earlier on July 21, UK Minister for Africa, Rt Hon Grant Shapps MP, said:

“The Burundian government has failed to ensure the necessary conditions for credible, inclusive and peaceful elections. I therefore do not consider these elections legitimate. Since April, 77 people have been killed and many arrested; over 170,000 Burundians have become refugees and freedom of expression has been curbed. The Burundian government’s refusal to engage in political dialogue has destabilised the country.

“I urge the Burundian government to accept the reality on the ground and to uphold the spirit of the Arusha Agreement. I call for calm and restraint from all sides.  Otherwise, the significant progress Burundi has made since the end of the civil war is in danger of being lost.”
  On July 21, the US State Department issued this statement:
"The United States warns that elections held under the current conditions in Burundi will not be credible and will further discredit the government.

"The legitimacy of the electoral process in Burundi over the past few months has been tainted by the government’s harassment of opposition and civil society members, closing down of media outlets and political space, and intimidation of voters. Dozens have been killed, and as many as 167,000 Burundians are now refugees in neighboring nations.

"The government’s insistence on going forward with Presidential elections on Tuesday risks its legitimacy in the eyes of its citizens and of the international community. More serious is the risk of unraveling the fragile progress made through the implementation of the Arusha Agreement, which states clearly that no Burundi president shall serve more than two terms in office.

"We commend the East African Community and the Government of Uganda for their efforts to encourage political dialogue, and are disappointed that the Government of Burundi has thus far failed to participate in good faith in this dialogue. We are deeply concerned that Foreign Minister Nyamitwe also failed to approve entry for African Union human rights monitors in advance of the election, preventing the multitude of allegations of human rights violations and abuses from being properly investigated.

"We underscore our commitment to helping seek accountability for those who commit or instigate politically-motivated violence and other human rights abuses in Burundi.

"Attempts by the Government of Burundi to deny citizens the ability to choose their leadership freely, without intimidation and threat of violence, will force the United States to carefully review all aspects of our partnership not yet suspended, including the imposition of visa restrictions on those responsible for -- or complicit in -- promoting instability in Burundi through violence.

"We strongly urge all parties to recommit themselves to upholding the Arusha Agreement and its power-sharing arrangement, the cornerstone of peace and security over the past decade in Burundi."
  But no one in the UN Security Council, where France holds the pen on Burundi, even asked for a meeting or briefing in the days before the election.
  On the night of July 20, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issued this statement:
"The Secretary-General takes note of the indefinite suspension of the inter-Burundian dialogue that started on 14 July 2015 under the facilitation of Uganda pursuant to the recommendations of the Summit of the East African Community (EAC) of 6 July 2015. He commends the efforts of President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda and of the East African Community (EAC) and calls on all organizations and Burundi’s partners to work together to help Burundians resolve their differences peacefully.

"The Secretary-General notes that the suspension of the dialogue took place without agreement being reached on a range of issues that would have contributed to the creation of a climate conducive to the holding of credible and peaceful elections, as contained in the relevant recommendations of the EAC and the African Union.

"In this worrisome context, and following the decision of the Burundian government to hold the presidential election on 21 July, the Secretary-General calls on the authorities to do all in their power to ensure security and a peaceful atmosphere during the election. He further calls on all parties to refrain from any acts of violence that could compromise the stability of Burundi and the region.

"The Secretary-General reiterates his appeal for the resumption of a frank dialogue among all parties and urges them to avoid undermining the progress achieved in building democracy since the signing of the Arusha Agreements.

"The Secretary-General recalls that the United Nations Electoral Observation Mission, in accordance with its Security Council mandate to observe the electoral process before, during and after the elections, continues to undertake this task and has deployed observers countrywide to that effect. He calls on all parties to facilitate their work and calls, in particular, on the government to ensure their security."
  Before 5 pm on July 2 Inner City Press asked the UN Security Council president if any Council member asked for a meeting or statement. 
  "No one has," UNSC president Gerard von Bohemen of New Zealand told Inner City Press.
 At the July 20 noon briefing, Inner City Press asked UN deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq:
Inner City Press: I wanted to ask you about Burundi.  Tomorrow, it’s slated to be the presidential election with the controversial third term, and the Government has stopped attending the "mediation" or facilitation sessions sponsored by Uganda.  So, what is the UN… I know that you were deferring to that mediation, but now it's, they say, adjourned, but it seems like the Government's not participating.  What does the UN plan to do and what report do you have on violence, including repeated reported shelling today in Bujumbura?

Deputy Spokesman Haq:  At this stage, regarding the violence, our Electoral Mission, MENUB, is working to get an assessment of the conditions.  It will have an assessment of the election whenever it happens, which it will then share with the Security Council.  And we would try to provide details with you of what the electoral mission's assessment is, once we receive that.  Regarding the political process, the United Nations wasn't involved in the process that was taking place over the weekend.  We are aware of the reports concerning the failure of the Government side to attend the talks.  Of course, we are supportive of the efforts by the facilitation under the facilitator that had been designated, President [Yoweri] Museveni, to try to bring the sides together, and we hope that that process can succeed.  Meanwhile, we're monitoring the situation on the ground, and we'll issue any further statements including, like I said, the assessment, as circumstances warrant.

Inner City Press:  This MENUB mission, there seem to be different understandings or reports from Burundi.  How many people are actually out… will actually be out tomorrow observing election places?

Deputy Spokesman:  Well, like I said, once the Election Day occurs, we'll get some details from the Mission about its presence and its work.  But, at this stage, the basic point is it has a clear Security Council mandate to report back to the Council, and that's what it's going to do.
  Back on July 16, a group of UN experts -- independent, to be sure -- issued a call for action by the UN Security Council, where the "penholder" on Burundi has been notably quiet. 
  Later on July 16, Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press: on Burundi, I assume that you've seen this… the group of six UN independent Special Rapporteurs have called for greater action to prevent atrocities in the country.  They specifically talk about the role of the Security Council that hasn't met for a week on this and that the elections are now right around the corner.  Has the D… has DPA asked to meet with the Security Council, asked to provide any information?  What's the UN doing as [Yoweri] Museveni has left? What's…

Spokesman:  It's a situation where we're continuing… continuing to watch both on the ground through our presence there.  Our colleagues here are monitoring the situation closely.  What the Security Council intends to do, that is up to the Security Council to decide.

Inner City Press: But I guess what I'm saying is under this supposed [Human] Rights up Front policy, the idea would be, like, when the DPA thinks that atrocities could take place, they ask to meet with the Security Council or they…

Spokesman:  Listen, I think we've… the situation… the very unstable situation in Burundi continues to be of concern to us.  We flagged it here from this podium.  The Secretary-General and others have been involved in talking to people on the phone.  We're continuing to watch it, and if we have more to say…

Inner City Press: I know I'd asked you this before, but when is the… has the Secretary-General sought to speak to President [Pierre] Nkurunziza during any of these many weeks and months?

Spokesman Dujarric:  I have no updates on his contacts.
   The experts among other things said:
“The world is witnessing an escalating pattern of politically motivated violence in Burundi, enabled by the country’s decades-long tradition of impunity. The international community must not simply stand by and wait for mass atrocities to unfold, thereby risking a major conflict of regional proportions before it finally decides to act... We also witness efforts to coerce the judiciary, some of whose highest members have fled the country claiming their lives were at risk. In the meantime, armed militias, with the collaboration of authorities, exercise violence against civilians. In these circumstances, it is not surprising that the results of the 29 June elections have generally not been endorsed.
“The absence of independent media and a climate of repression and fear to exercise civil rights and express opinions, notably by peacefully taking to the streets, have marred the recent elections and will also be defining the forthcoming presidential elections, now scheduled for 21 July. The postponement by six days of the presidential elections does not remedy this blatant deficiency.
“If the government persists in holding presidential elections under the current circumstances – something even the former first Vice-President objected to after also having fled the country – they will in no way confer any legitimacy on the to-be-elected authorities. On the contrary, the elections are highly likely to result in major instability and confrontations in Burundi, with the potential to spread to the region.
“The Security Council has a unique role for peace and security and for preventing conflicts worldwide. This is a crisis that is eminently preventable – everyone can see the risks. What is lacking is action.Given the painful history of Burundi and the region, the long engagement of the United Nations in the country to re-build peace, the Security Council must be all the more alerted to the increasing potential of an escalation of massive violence. Burundians, who live in the world’s third poorest country must be spared another cycle of violence, with the misery and destruction that violence always leave on its wake. They look to the Security Council to live up to its unique role in the prevention of mass atrocities.”
   They noted, as Inner City Press has, that it was a full week ago, on July 9, that “the situation on Burundi was most recently discussed by the Security Council.” The experts included the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence, Pablo de Greiff; Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, Christof Heyns; Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers, Gabriela Knaul; Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders; Michel Forst; Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye; Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association, Maina Kiai; and the Chairperson of the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, Seong-Phil Hong. 
  Regarding the Yoweri Museveni "mediation," which by silence the UN Security Council is implicitly endorsing, Inner City Press on July 15 asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Presss: on Burundi, President [Yoweri] Museveni has left the country, his proposal was not accepted.  He's left his defence minister there.  One, did the UN stand behind those proposals?  Did they have any idea what proposals he was going to make?  Are they now working with the defence minister?  It's okay.  I have another one on this, but it's up to you.

Spokesman Dujarric:  As I said, the UN supported the mediation process put forward by the East Africa Community, which is being led by Museveni.  I don't have any more details from what is actually…

Inner City Press:  How did the UN support it?

Spokesman:  We're supporting… we're supportive of the facilitation effort.

Inner City Press: There are also reports there that the authorities are declining to give death certificates to people killed by either police or militia.  And I wanted to know… you'd said that the human rights mechanism of the UN that's there is there… is recording and routinely reports.  So where are the reports?

Spokesman:  I will check when they're next scheduled to report.

  In the hours the followed, again nothing.
  On July 14, Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Dujarric:
Inner City Press: On Burundi, now President [Yoweri] Museveni is in Bujumbura.  They say he's holding these talks in the Hotel Bel Air residence.  Is Mr. [Abdoulaye] Bathily or any UN representative taking part, and do you have anything on a possible FDLR presence on the border?

Spokesman:  I don't believe Mr. Bathily is there.  I know the Secretary-General and President Museveni spoke briefly yesterday, if I'm not mistaken.  They are scheduled to speak before the day is over.  I have nothing on the Burundi border.
  Moments later Inner City Press asked the UN's envoy to the DR Congo Martin Kobler about the FDLR, both in DRC and as regards Burundi.Video here. First, the Security Council's president for July Gerard von Bohemen indicated that the only discussion of Burundi on July 14 was as a source of refugees to DRC, which Kobler said the DRC could handle.
 In the Security Council chamber, Kobler had said, "I have been monitoring the situation in Burundi very closely, as the country has descended into violence over the last two months. Today, over 140,000 people have fled into neighboring countries, including 12,800 to the DRC. I highlight these events to remind us again of the importance of respecting the constitution, and of creating the necessary political space for a national consensus around elections."
  Inner City Press asked Kobler if by this he meant that a third term for Pierre Nkurunziza would violate the constitution of Burundi, or Arusha Agreements. But Kobler didn't answer this. (Reuters cut in, and didn't report a word of what Kobler said about Burundi).
  On July 13, Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press: On Burundi, you said that the UN human rights team there is recording... when are they going to report that?  There are these pictures of people described as rebels being arrested by the Government that many people are saying are just farmers who happened to belong to opposition parties.  There's also pictures of corpses.  When is the UN actually going to report on what it's witnessed in the last day?

Spokesman Dujarric:  I'll check with them, but our human rights colleagues tend to report on a regular basis.
  So when will that be? Inner City Press on July 13 also asked Dujarric:
Inner City Press: MONUSCO [United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo], ist said there are forces on the border now with Burundi gathered.  So I'm asking you this now, because there's some concern coming from both directions, interventions.  Is it anything to your knowledge that MONUSCO, DRC or DPA is aware of?

Spokesman:  Let me check.  Thank you, all.  Have great day.
  To this has the UN been reduced.
 From the July 10 transcript:
Inner City Press: I wanted to ask you in Burundi, they're now, you know, in the last hours, there's reports of heavy gunfire on border with Rwanda.  There's been grenade attacks in the capital, and some are saying that people seeking to flee are not being allowed to by the ruling party's militia.  So what's the status of the UN both observing these things?  Does the UN acknowledge that things have actually gotten heated up since even yesterday's Security Council meeting?

Spokesman:  No, clearly.  I think we very much strongly condemn any type of violent action, any action that is meant to destabilize the already tense and fragile situation in Burundi.  We've taken note, as you mentioned, very recently there have been clashes, reported clashes between Burundi's national defence forces and unidentified armed groups in the country's north on the Rwandan border, and we're following the situation closely.  And we're trying to verify the authenticity of these reports.

Inner City Press:  Given that… I mean it seems like there's no real public accounting or reporting about the Museveni facilitation and there obviously… there's some issues in Uganda at present, so maybe these occupied by those.  But what's the UN doing in terms of…

Spokesman:  I think we're there to support this facilitation, which is organized by the East African Community under the blessing of the African Union.  So you should also address your questions to them.
  On July 9, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights delivered the speech below to the UN Security Council, click here for that, and here for Burundi's Ambassador's speech. 
  After the Security Council's last meeting of July 9, about Syria, Inner City Press asked the Council's president for July, Gerard van Bohemen of New Zealand, if the idea of postponing Burundi's election for a mere week to July 22 was discussed in closed door consultations. He replied that Constitutional issues were discussed but no decision or conclusion reached. Video here.

 Earlier in the day at the UN noon briefing on July 9, Inner City Press asked UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Stephane Dujarric for the UN's or Ban's position on a delay of a mere week, to July 22, transcript here:
Inner City Press: in Tayé Brook Zerihoun’s briefing to the Council about Burundi, he said that there's been no formal forum for dialogue since 26 June, and then the permanent representative of Burundi said that there is some discussion of moving back the election a week to 21-22 July, he said, consistent with the Constitution.  So I wanted to know, is Mr. [Abdoulaye] Bathily part of these discussions?  And what does the UN think?  Does the UN think that a one-week extension is… addresses the issues that were raised by…

Spokesman Dujarric:  I think the issues of the political climate and to create a political climate is conducive to elections in Burundi will be discussed through the facilitation mechanism, which will be led by Mr. [Yoweri] Museveni and supported by the UN.

Inner City Press:  But since he's saying… as of today, he said there is no mechanism, so it's going to begin between now and the 15th or now and…

Spokesman Dujarric:  Again, this will be led by President Museveni, so I would urge you to ask questions in that direction.
 (Before the Security Council meeting started, the questions or chatter outside was unrelated to Burundi.) 
 On July 8, Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press: In the Srebrenica debate just now, Prince Zeid said the UN must be resolute.  Had this been in the case in Sri Lanka in 2009 or now in Sudan, Syria, Central African Republic or even Burundi and Myanmar, the consequences would have been different.  I have questions about a number of those countries, but I wanted to ask you, on Burundi, where he says "even Burundi", I wanted to know, one, does the UN have any response now that the ruling party has announced its whopping win on 29 June?  And, two, people are coming forward with names of victims and names of alleged killers, including victim Serge Bizimana, and they say police officer [UN says inaudible, ICP said JM Havugayezu] killed him.  They have a picture of him.. I'm just wondering:  What is the UN doing on the ground to… either to look into these cases after the fact or prevent them going forward?

Spokesman Dujarric:  Well, I think on… on the political situation, as I said yesterday, we fully support the work of the facilitation, which will now be led by Mr. [Yoweri] Museveni.  And obviously, the Secretary-General fully supports the work of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, his team, and the human rights situation in Burundi is of concern, as we've often stated.

Inner City Press:  But, just one follow-up.  If… if as the report that was read out from this podium last week was that the elections held on 29 June didn't have the conditions of fairness or freedom and… so what's your response to the results that are announced?  Does the UN recognize those results?

Spokesman Dujarric:  It's not up to the UN to recognize or not recognize the results.  We did not participate in the election, as I understand it.  It is clear that all Burundian parties need to support the facilitation to create the right political atmosphere.

Inner City Press:  What was MENUB (United Nations Electoral Mission in Burundi] doing if not participating and observing?  I mean, there's this…

Spokesman Dujarric:  I understand.  I do not believe they were involved in these particular elections. 
  Again we ask: so MENUB was NOT observing the June 29 elections, just as UNDP's Helen Clark tweeted then deleted? This is a new low for the UN. On July 9, Zeid and Tayé-Brook Zerihoun are set to brief the Security Council. Watch this site.
 On July 7, Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press: I wanted to ask you on Burundi, I know that Mr. [Abdoulaye] Bathily did go to the EAC (East African Community) meeting.  They basically named Yoweri Museveni as the facilitator between the Government and the opposition in Burundi and asked the Government to delay the presidential election at least until the end of July.  I wanted to know, one, does the UN play any role in this Museveni mediation?  Two, does the UN, DPA (Department of Political Affairs) or Mr. Bathily, do they support this call to postpone the election?

Spokesman Dujarric:  Sure.  I think… yes, Mr. Bathily took part in the EAC meeting.  He briefed on his role as part of the international facilitation.  We've taken note of what has come out of the summit, of the East African Summit.  And we very much welcome the appointment of Ugandan President Museveni as the facilitator of the dialogue in Burundi.  Obviously, we will see how President Museveni intends to take this new format forward.  But what is clear is that the UN will support this facilitation effort in a way that helps create the right atmosphere for elections in Burundi.

Inner City Press:  Given that it's now the 7th and the election is… and President Nkurunziza is campaigning and the date is set for the 15th, can you imagine this facilitation somehow creating the conditions that… that the UN… the MENUB (United Nations Electoral Mission in Burundi) report said should be required by the 15th?

Spokesman Dujarric:  You know, obviously, I think it's… the situation in Burundi has been challenging, to say the least.  We have a new facilitation format, I think, led by a regional President.  We'll support that, and, obviously, it's up to Mr. Museveni to take it forward.  But the UN very much will support his action.  We hope they do get under way as quickly as possible.

Inner City Press:  And last, has the Secretary-General made any call since your last listing, where he spoke to President [Jakaya] Kikwete?  Does he intend to speak with President Museveni or anyone else on this topic?

Spokesman:  The Secretary-General and his aides remain in contact with regional leaders.  Obviously, the Secretary-General will be out of pocket, basically for the next 24 hours.  But as soon as we can update you the phone list, we will.
  In the eight hours after, no updates were given. The "out of pocket" Ban Ki-moon managed to issue a statement, about Boko Haram. Inner City Press asked the president of the Security Council for July, Gerard van Bohemen, is last week's draft press statement is dead. He replied it was decided that the previous Presidential Statement was strong. But that was before the June 29 election, no? The Security Council is scheduled to meet about Burundi again on July 9; we'll be there.
  The day before on July 6, Inner City Press asked Ban's deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq about it. (This was before the East African Community urged postponement until July 30 and named Yoweri Museveni as the mediator, and UN DPA did not respond with its position). From the July 6 UN transcript:
Inner City Press: over the weekend or even now a couple of days ago, it seems like the Government in Burundi has said that they reject Mr. [Abdoulaye] Bathily as the mediator, saying he wasn't sufficiently deferential, or they didn't actually kind of register or meet with him.  One, I wanted to know what your response is to their critique of what he's done.  But, also, what's the next step?  Is it the case that he's no longer mediating there?  Who's representing the UN at the EAC [East African Community] meeting?  And what… what's the Secretary-General's thoughts as we approach 15 July?  Thanks.

Deputy Spokesman Haq:  Okay.  Well, first of all, on the question of these remarks that you saw over the weekend in the media, the Secretary-General expresses his deep appreciation for the work done so far by Special Representative Abdoulaye Bathily as a member of the Joint International Facilitation Team.  The Joint International Facilitation Team, of which Special Representative Bathily is a member, was established by a Summit of the African Union Peace and Security Council.  The conclusions reached by the Facilitation Team were endorsed by all the organizations forming the team.  We reiterate our full support for the diplomatic initiatives that Special Representative Bathily has conducted with professionalism and integrity, and in coordination with the other members of the Joint International Facilitation Team.  You asked what he's doing right now.  Mr. Bathily attended the East African Community, the EAC Summit today in Dar-es-Salaam at the invitation of the EAC Chair, President Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania.  We will await the report from the EAC summit before considering further actions to facilitate political dialogue among Burundian stakeholders.  The UN is committed to helping the Burundian parties create the conditions for peaceful and credible elections.  This requires a corresponding commitment from the parties, acting in good faith, to achieve this goal.

Inner City Press:  Can you see the election going forward on the 15… given the report that came out last Thursday and the impending presidential election with Mr. [Pierre] Nkurunziza running, can the UN foresee that as being even possibly fair, free and without violence?

Deputy Spokesman Haq:  Well, this is ultimately a question that's up to the Burundian parties themselves.  You'll have seen what we have been saying in recent days, and we stand by what we've said.  And, regarding further steps, of course, again, we'll await a report from the EAC summit before we consider further actions
 Meanwhile Burundian civil society organizations have said they "condemn the electoral forcing made by President Nkurunziza  in as much as it is a dead-end path taken in total disregard of the Arusha Agreement, the Constitution and the relevant decisions taken by the East African Community and the African Union."
  Back on July 2 UN deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq at the noon briefing announced that the UN's observer MENUB mission's report "is available in my Office."
  Inner City Press, which has been asking for and about the report for two days, immediately went there. But it was NOT in the Spokesperson's Office. Back in the briefing room, Inner City Press asked why not, and if UN human rights official Ivan Simonovic would make public his Office's findings about killings in Burundi. "It's a closed meeting," Haq replied, of the Security Council proceedings.
   Haq in response to Inner City Press' question read out a short summary of the MENUB report.  Reuters reported Haq's if-asked AS the UN's findings, and later another global media couched the UN's position on Burundi as something that spokesperson Haq "told Reuters." This is the UN, & Reuters.
  Later the MENUB report did become available, in hard copy. Inner City Press tweeted a photo and the conclusion that on June 29 "the environment was not conducive to free, credible and inclusive elections.”
  But as Inner City Press asked Haq, doesn't that apply to the presidential election still set for July 15? Inner City Press asked if Ban thinks it should be postponed; there was no clear answer. Will the UN be represented at the East African Community meeting on July 6 or 7? UNclear. Here's more of the MENUB report:
MENUB  “observed media freedom restrictions, violations of human rights and other fundamental freedoms;" it was in “50 municipalities out of 119... polling procedures were not respected in all cases.”
   Inner City Press continues to ask, if MENUB and Burundi were so important to the UN, why was the mission's chair Cassam Uteem not replaced upon departure?
 Inner City Press asked Haq who in the UN system is monitoring or even simply counting the people killed in Cibitoke and elsewhere. 
  Haq mentioned the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, whose Prince Zeid is slated to brief the Security Council next week. That Office is bound up in a scandal about not reporting sexual abuse of children in the Central African Republic. And here?

 As Inner City Press reported on June 30, a coalition of civil society groups has written to the African Union urging sanctions on Nkurunziza. Inner City Press has obtained the letter and put it online here.
   This comes as the United States proposes UN sanctions against at least six individuals in South Sudan, and after the US State Department on June 29 put out this statement:
"The United States supports the AU’s decision not to send electoral observers in recognition that free, fair and credible elections are impossible given the current security situation and the closure of political and media space.  We share the AU’s concern about the hardships facing the people of Burundi and urge President Nkurunziza to cooperate fully with the AU and regional organizations to resolve the current crisis and enable credible elections to go forward at a later date."
  If the US supports the AU position, what of the UN's UNclear position?
 On June 30, Inner City Press asked UN Deputy Spokesperson Farhan Haq where the observation(s) of MENUB are. Tomorrow, he said. We'll see.
  On June 28, both UN Secretary General and the UN's MENUB said that the MENUB mission IS observing the legislative election, unlike the African Union which announced that it would not, due to conditions not being met.
  But in a parallel universe, on June 29 the head of the UN Development Program Helen Clark tweeted that "UN is not observing and has withdrawn from support to the conduct of the election." Then after Inner City Press noted it, Clark deleted it. Thus does the UN try to have it both ways.
   Later on June 29 along with a question about climate change Inner City Press asked Ban Ki-moon about Burundi, and if the UN is observing. Video here. From the UN's own transcript:
Inner City Press: Because it is the day of the election in Burundi, I have to ask this, where does it stand for the international community for an election that is taking place without any observers, what can be done? What is the next step forward?

SG Ban Ki-moon: "Let me briefly answer your question about the current situation in Burundi. Yesterday, all day long, I have been speaking to some African leaders in the region, including President Kikwete of Tanzania who is acting as President of the East African Community. I have also spoken to AU Chairperson Madame Zuma, as well as President Zuma of South Africa. They are the leaders who have been constantly engaging in this. I have been expressing my serious concern that while all the opposition political parties have boycotted - and even the Vice-President and the Parliamentary speakers – they have all condemned and criticized President Nkurunziza and left their country because of their serious concern. While UNDP and the United Nations have withdrawn our electoral support there, our United Nations observation team is now observing this election process. Now it seems that the election has been continuing. I reiterated my appeal to all Burundian political leaders to consider the wider interest of the people of their country and to resolve political issues through dialogue in order to preserve peace and strengthen national reconciliation.  I also emphasize the responsibility of the Government of Burundi to ensure that the elections take place in a secure environment and also to guarantee the safety and security of UN observers, so that they can perform their mandated responsibilities free from intimidation and harassment. This is mandated by the Security Council. This is what I can tell you at this time. I am very closely observing and watching and coordinating and consulting with African leaders. Thank you."
  While the answer is appreciated, it remained unclear what Clark had meant, and the UN's stance on the elections and observing them. Inner City Press asked for a yes or no answer, was Clark wrong in saying the UN is not observing - and no clear answer was given. 
  We also note that while Laurent Fabius of France, the UN Security Council penholder on Burundi, was doing this as a joint press encounter with Ban, Fabius did not answer on Burundi at all. We'll have more on this.

   We note that Helen Clark hope to replace Ban, if the UNSG position slips away from the Eastern European Group. Inner City Press has alsoreported the UN's retaliation against a staff member who dared to tweet back at Helen Clark, here. (Then again, Ban Ki-moon's security detail ejected Inner City Press from an "open" meeting this morning, at the demand of UN Peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous, story herevideo here.)
  Update: in classic UN fashion, after being caught trying to have it both ways on Burundi, Helen Clark's tweet simply "disappeared" - but here is a cell phone photograph of it

   Even when the UN purports to answer on its role, it does so quietly and selectively, while remaining too quiet about local radio stations shut down. Then Ban Ki-moon speaks in a statement, UNclear as usual: this time saying that the UN's MENUB mission WILL observe the elections, and not even adding that observation doesn't validate the voting. This while the African Union has said it will NOT observe on June 29, here.
  On June 28, Ban Ki-moon issued a this statement:
"The Secretary-General is concerned about the Government of Burundi's insistence on going ahead with elections on 29 June despite the prevailing political and security environment. 

"The International Facilitation Team in Bujumbura has been working hard to assist the Burundian parties to reach a consensus on the way forward for holding free, fair inclusive and peaceful elections.  The Secretary-General deplores the intransigence of the parties that caused those important efforts to be inconclusive.

"The Secretary-General recalls the decisions of the Security Council, including resolution 2137 (2014), which mandated the United Nations Observer Mission in Burundi (MENUB) to observe the elections. In fulfilling its mandate, MENUB will continue to work in a professional and impartial manner, in accordance with national laws applicable to electoral matters and international instruments, principles and rules of election observation.  The Secretary-General emphasizes the responsibility of the Government of Burundi to ensure that elections take place in a secure environment and also to guarantee the safety and security of UN observers so that they can perform their mandated responsibilities free from intimidation or harassment. 
"The Secretary-General reiterates his appeal to all Burundian political leaders to consider the wider interest of the people of their country and to resolve political issues through dialogue in order to preserve peace and strengthen national reconciliation. Condemning recent attacks reported in the country, he appeals to all Burundians to refrain from violent acts, in line with the Charter of Non-Violence agreed by all parties."
  What about not validating?
  On June 27, the UN's replacement envoy Bathily held a press conference in Bujumbura which the UN did not live-stream, nor provide an audio feed or file from (unlike in Mali), nor any transcript (unlike in DR Congo).
  Now the UN's MENUB mission has put out a press release arguing that it is not legitimating Nkurunziza's elections. But this press release was not distributed by the UN Spokesperson's Office, to which Inner City Press has directed multiple questions about what, if anything, MENUB is doing.
  And so the Free UN Coalition for Access publishes this fast translation:
“MENUB was put in place in accordance with UN Security Council resolution 2137 (2014). MENUB is mandated to follow the electoral process in Burundi before, during and after the elections, to to report to the Secretary General of the UN who, for his part, will report to the Security Council. The implementation of this mandate began on January 1, 2015. To this end, MENUB operates in a neutral and impartial manner. Its observation is carried out by professionals and is based on national laws, international instruments and all the applicable rules and principles of election observation. The first time of MENUB observers were deployed across Burundi starting in January 2015.
“The observation of elections by MENUB cannot and should not be interpreted as support to any party or as a validation of the process.
“MENUB invites all relevant parties to respect the neutrality of the observers deployed on the ground and gives heartfelt thanks to the support afforded to it in the execution of its mandate.”
   Is it true, that MENUB's now murky role CANNOT be interpreted as validating or legitimating Nkurunziza's elections? Especially now that Ban Ki-moon has "spoken" without saying anything about not validating? 
  A coalition of civil society groups in Burundi issued a call for a systematic boycott of the parliamentary election set for June 29. (If held, these elections could be a set up to further change the constitution.)
  So when the UN's replacement envoy to Burundi, UNOCA's Bathily, held a press conference in Bujumbura on June 27, one would have expect the UN to find a way to live-stream or at least audio-stream it. At least the Free UN Coalition for Access had and has such an expectation.
 But it did not happen. Only second and third hand did Bathily's bon mots come out, including that the UN is not there to impose its views but to facilitate. So it has said nothing about the third term -- and, Inner City Press understands, favors the opposition just accepting the third term. 
  When Bathily was at the UN in New York, he did not take any questions at the stakeout. FUNCA opposes this too, part of the Ladsousification of the UN. If all the UN has are its words, why play it like this? This month Ban Ki-moon's security detail threw the Press out of an open meeting of UN Peacekeeping; on June 26, Ban's Conference Officer(s) ordered Inner City Press to stop broadcasting an open meetingvia Twitter's Periscope service.
 Why wasn't the Bujumbura press conference at least Periscoped, or audio streamed? We'll have more on this.
 The Security Council on June 26 agreed to and adopted a version of France's draft Presidential Statement which Inner City Press exclusively published earlier this week; then Burundi's representative gave a speech vowing elections will take place on June 29 and to avoid the situations of Burkina Faso and Cote d'Ivoire, and saying that opposition is "childlike" with demands from "outside the Continent." Here is the UNSC Presidential Statement:
"The Security Council reiterates its deep concern regarding the grave security and political situation in Burundi against the backdrop of the forthcoming, communal, presidential and senatorial elections and for the impact of the crisis in the region. The Security Council strongly condemns all acts of violence and human rights violations and abuses and recalls that those responsible for such violence should be held accountable and brought to justice.
The Security Council welcomes the regional and sub-regional efforts aimed at addressing the crisis, and in this regard takes note of the conclusions of the East African Community (EAC) summits held on 13 May and 31 May 2015 in Dar-es-Salaam, of the communiquÿ issued by the African Union Peace and Security Council (AU PSC) after its Summit held on 13 June 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa, and of the letters sent by the Government of Burundi to the Security Council.
The Security Council pays tribute to the relentless efforts of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General (SESG) for the Great Lakes Region, Safd Djinnit and recalls that Burundian stakeholders had made some progress in a difficult dialogue thanks to SESG Djinnit's able facilitation,
The Security Council takes note of the African Union's statement that the political dialogue has not produced expected results and that the current situation could jeopardize the important gains recorded following the signing of the Arusha Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation in Burundi and the Global Ceasefire agreement of 2003, and affect the stability of the region,
The Security Council welcomes the resumption of the dialogue between all the Burundian parties, under the facilitation of the AU, the UN, the EAC and the ICGLR. In this regard, the Security Council welcomes the appointment of Professor Ibrahima Fall by the AU, Special Representative of the chairperson of the Commission for the Great Lakes Head of the AU Liaison office in Bujumbura. The Security Council also welcomes the arrival in Bujumbura of United Nations SRSG for Central Africa and Head of UNOCA, Abdoulaye Bathily, which allows for the international mediation to immediately assist all parties to expedite the search for a consensual political solution to the crisis.
While acknowledging that further steps must continue to be taken by parties to adhere to the decisions taken by the EAC and the AU PSC, the Council calls on the Burundian parties to urgently participate in an inclusive dialogue which should focus, in the spirit of the Arusha Agreements, and the Constitution, on the measures to be taken to create conditions conducive to the organization of free, fair, transparent and credible elections.
The Council takes note of the statement in the AU PSC Communique of 13 June that the date of the election should be set by consensus between the Burundian parties, in the spirit of the EAC's communiqu6 of 32 May 2025 requesting a postponement of the elections, and on the basis of a technical assessment to be undertaken by the United Nations.
The Security Council emphasizes that the dialogue should address all matters on which the parties disagree. The Security Council further emphasizes that this dialogue should address concerns related to the reinstatement of private media; the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, in particular freedoms of expression and of peaceful assembly, including for members of the political opposition to campaign freely, as guaranteed by the Constitution of Burundi; the release of those arbitrarily detained following demonstrations; the respect for the rule of the law; and the urgent disarmament of all armed youth groups allied with political parties, as reflected in the conditions of the EAC communique of 31 May 2025, conditions to be met prior to the holding of elections.
The Security Council welcomes the commitment of the AU and the Chairperson of the AU Commission to fully assume the responsibilities stemming from its role as Guarantor of the Arusha Agreement, as well as that of the region not to stand-by in case the situation deteriorates.
In this regard, the Security Council welcomes the decision of the AU to immediately deploy human rights observers and other civilian personnel; to deploy AU military experts to verify the process of disarming of all armed youth groups allied with political parties, which will submit regular reports on the implementation of the disarmament process, and to deploy an AU election observer mission if conditions for the organization of free, fair, transparent and credible elections are met. The Council urges the Government of Burundi and other relevant actors to extend their full cooperation to these processes.
The Security Council also welcomes the AU PSC's decision to send, by the first week of July, a ministerial delegation including the Commission, to assess the implementation of the conditions required by EAC, the AU and the Council for the holding of the elections.
The Council calls on the Electoral Mission of the United Nations in Burundi (MENUB) to fully and actively pursue the implementation of its mandate in accordance with Resolution 2137 (2014) including to swiftly report to the Security Council before, during and after the elections.
The Security Council reiterates its concern about the difficult situation of the Burundian refugees who fled their country into the neighboring States, commends the host countries (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania), as well as humanitarian agencies, for their support to the affected populations, and calls upon the international community to provide the necessary humanitarian assistance. The Council urges the Government of Burundi to create the conditions conducive to their early return.
The Security Council calls on all actors in the region the preserve the safety and security of populations in the region."
 On June 25 at the UN Inner City Press asked UN deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq:
Inner City Press: I wanted to ask, about Burundi, one of the Vice-Presidents, Gervais Rufyikiri, has fled the country, and he said that after he came out in opposition to the current President running for a third term, he left in fear of his life to Belgium.  So I wanted know, that seems pretty… he’s an elected official, etc.  One, is the UN doing anything to provide protection to people that feel under such threats within the country or trying to arrange for it?  And what’s the UN — how does this reflect on the dialogue the UN is trying to create?

Question:  Well, first of all, regarding the Vice-President, you’ll have seen, of course, there have been other people who have also fled the country, and you’ll have seen the concerns we expressed at the time and those concerns remain the case.  We want all the people of Burundi to be able to live without fear and we want, in particular, for the people who are going to be voting in any forthcoming elections to be able to do so without fear and to have the assurance that any elections will be free and inclusive.

Regarding the dialogue on Burundi, that dialogue, which resumed on 23 June, has, in fact, continued today with the Special Representative Abdoulaye Bathily’s participation.  Meanwhile, in New York, the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, Jeffrey Feltman, met this morning with the Permanent Representative of Burundi to discuss the state of the electoral process. 
  And what is coming of these quiet UN moves?
 On June 24 at the UN in New York Inner City Press asked Stephane Dujarric, spokesman for the UN and presumably for UN envoy Bathily,video here:
Inner City Press: on Burundi, I wanted to ask, there was — yesterday it was said that the ruling party of Burundi would not take part in these most recent talks with Mr. [Abdoulaye)] Bathily.  Now it's said that the Government is but the ruling party isn't.  What's the status of those talks and the CNDD-FDD?  And also it was reported that journalists were blocked from going to this Musaga area where a lot of crackdown is taking place.  Is Mr. Bathily aware of that, and does he have any comment on it?

Spokesman:  I don't know if he's aware of that.  We will check.  Mr. Bathily is just starting his work.  He's having discussions with various parties.  I think it's still a very fluid situation, as we all know, but he is continuing — he's continuing his work.

Question:  But, I mean, I'm sure you've seen the — like, yesterday they had  an event, and [UN PBC chair Seger]  said that he spoke with the ambassador here.  So it seems to me that the Secretariat is aware of the ruling party's position to not take part in…

Spokesman:  No, I understand.  But I think those things are being discussed locally.  They're being discussed on the ground, I think on, more than on a daily basis, so I don't want to speak for Mr. Bathily at this point. 
  Afterward, Dujarric told Inner City Press:
"On your question on Burundi, I was just handed an update which says that the political dialogue resumed on 23 June, which, by my calendar, is yesterday, and continued today with the facilitation of the African Union, the East African Community, the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region and the United Nations.  The Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Mr. Bathily, is representing the UN in the dialogue.  Participants who participate in the dialogue previously facilitated attended the meetings with the exception of the ruling party, the CNDD-FDD, its allies in the Copa and Sangwe Pader.  Today the Minister of the Interior represented the Government at the meeting.  We encourage all political parties that have yet to join the dialogue to join it and help reach consensus on the way forward."
  In New York, the International Peace Institute set up for June 23 an event with two UN officials on “lessons learned” from Burundi. Inner City Press went to the event, YouTube here.
  At IPI, Inner City Press asked why the UN was so reticent to discuss the Constitutionality of the third term, why it had stayed quiet on the arming of the ruling party's youth wing and, at the level of Ban Ki-moon, on the closing of radio stations and chasing out of the country of journalists. Inner City Press also asked why the UN Peacekeeping of Herve Ladsous keeps using Burundi security forces who have cracked down on unarmed civilians.
  Parfait Onanga-Anyanga, Former Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General in Burundi, gave a lengthy and passionate answer.
  Oscar Fernandez-Taranco, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support, said that Ban Ki-moon HAS spoken about media freedom in Burundi. If so, it's been muted -- and takes place as Ban's own security detail removed Inner City Press from an open meeting "organized" by Herve Ladsous last week. 
  The IPI event ended up being interesting and Inner City Press is glad it went, and that is has been told, from high up, that this will continue in the future. We'll see.

While UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson was at the African Union summit in Johannesburg where Burundi was discussed, Burundian independent media wrote to Secretary General Ban Ki-moon about the crackdown against them, sending to a copy to Inner City Press and the Free UN Coalition for Access, which is now online here.
 On June 16, after first declining to confirm receipt, the UN said the letter was received or "logged in." But what will be done? FUNCA has asked again, after Ban's own security detail was used to eject Inner City Press from a speech by Ban to UN Peacekeeping, which continues to use security personnel of Burundi which have fired on unarmed demonstrators.
 On June 21, Ban issued this statement - Bathily to Bujumbura - no word on the third term, much less freedom of press and assembly:
"The Secretary-General continues to follow with concern the political crisis in Burundi, which threatens to undo more than a decade of work to consolidate peace and reconciliation in the country. In this respect, he welcomes the communiqué of the meeting of the African Union Peace and Security Council held on 13 June at the level of Heads of State and Government.  With the communiqué, the African Union provided a clear way forward towards peaceful and credible elections in Burundi.
"The Secretary-General has requested his Special Representative and Head of the UN Regional Office for Central Africa, Abdoulaye Bathily, to offer good offices in Burundi in support of regional efforts to reduce tensions and help Burundians peacefully settle their differences. Special Representative Bathily will work closely with the African Union, the East African Community and the International Conference for the Great Lakes Region.  He will arrive in Bujumbura on Sunday, 21 June.
"The Secretary-General wishes to express deep gratitude to his Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region, Said Djinnit, for his tireless efforts impartially facilitating the dialogue among Burundian stakeholders during May and June of this year. 
"As elections draw near, the Secretary-General calls on all Burundian political leaders to address the current political crisis with the highest sense of responsibility. He urges them to resume political dialogue earnestly with a view to creating an environment conducive for peaceful, credible and inclusive elections."
On June 18, Inner City Press asked UN deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq:
Inner City Press: in Burundi, today there was a grenade attack in the capital that injured three and also a deadly grenade attack, I believe, yesterday.  And I'm wondering it doesn't seem like things are whatever the UNOCA [United Nations Office in Central Africa] individual is doing… calming down.  So, I'm just wondering is there any… what is the UN, what is the current status of the UN and other efforts to bridge the gap prior to an election that will have the current president on the ballot?

Deputy Spokesman:  We are continuing with our efforts.  As you know, our representative from the UN Office from Central Africa, Abdoulaye Bathily, is in touch with the various parties and he is continuing with these efforts.  We are concerned about the violence, including the various incidents that you just mentioned, and we are worried about the situation on the ground, which is why we are continuing to work with the parties and see what can be done to make sure that if elections are held that they will be safe, that they will be inclusive, that people can vote without fear and that the elections will be fair.
  But does that assume a run for a third term, and therefor a boycott of the parliamentary elections -- a set up for domination and even (further) constitutional change?
In a June 19 statement, the UN's expert on transitional justice Pablo de Greiff said Burundi's "authorities’ blatant failures to respect freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, the pre-conditions for any credible democratic society.” Again it seems the proposed third term was not directly addressed by the UN.
 On June 20 former head of UN Peacekeeping, now Crisis Group director Jean Marie Guehenno tweeted about de Grieff's statement. Inner City Press retweeted Guehenno's statement, asked about the continued use of Burundian security personnel by Guehenno's successor Herve Ladsous. Then Guehenno's tweet disappeared, so far without explanation.
   On June 16, Inner City Press asked about reports of the arrest and even torture of MSD leader Leonidas Nimpagaritse. UN Deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq said "we'll check;" Inner City Press asked what the UN's electoral mission is doing and it remains UNclear.
  As lead spokesman Stephane Dujarric answered Inner City Press on June 15, Haq said that UNOCA chief Bathily is in a sense replacing Said Djinnit for the UN on Burundi, to coordinate with the African Union.Transcript:
Inner City Press:  I wanted to ask you two things on Burundi.  One is you had said that the DSG and Mr. [Said] Djinnit would be in the [AU] summit.  Do you have… what was the term, what, if any, progress was made particularly on UN involvement in either replacing Mr. Djinnit or trying to address the ongoing disquiet there?  And also there was a letter of five or more Burundi media that was directed to the Secretary-General on June 11th.  I saw a copy was sent to Ms. [Susanna] Malcorra basically asking for the UN to get involved because they had to flee the country because their stations had been burned and closed and they have been threatened with violence by the Government.  What is the response of the UN system?

Spokesman:  I will take a look to see if we received that letter.  On Burundi, the Secretary-General requested his special representative and Head of UN Mission in Central Africa, Abdoulaye Bathily, to carry out consultations to ensure the effective participation of the UN in the international facilitation called for by the African Union Peace and Security Council to quote “to create conditions conducive to the holding of free, transparent and credible elections in Burundi, as well as on the matters on which the parties disagree” — which is what the African Union Peace and Security Committee issued.
  But when Inner City Press asked Haq for the UN's view of the AU sending (military?) observers to Burundi, Haq did not comment. So what of Nimpagaritse?
   Ban's UN has said little amid the closing down of independent media in Burundi, other than generalities when FUNCA and Inner City Press have asked about it. Now what will they do?
 The letter is from Bob Rugurika of Radio Publique Africaine, Patrick Nduwimana of Radio Bonesha FM, Anne Niyuhire of Radio Isanganiro, Innocent Muhozi of Radi-Tele Renaissance, Alexandre Niyungeko of UBJ and the Association Burundaise de radiodiffuseires, here.
 On June 12 Inner City Press asked Ban's spokesman Stephane Dujarric:
Inner City Press: In Burundi, documents emerged, a ruling, legal opinion by the ministers of justice of the East African Community states, and they read very closely the constitution and the Arusha declaration and they say that a third term would be illegal, that he’s not eligible, that it's clear the first term was under the Constitution.  I'm wondering, one, is there any response by the Secretariat, that it's been sort of not addressing this question?  And was Mr. Djinnit aware of this ruling during the time of this facilitation?  And if so, why didn't it speak more clearly on the subject?
Spokesman Dujarric:  I think that Mr. Djinnit is one of our more experienced diplomats, experienced negotiator, mediator.  I'm sure he was aware of everything he needed to be aware of.  I don't have a response to that....
Inner City Press:  Is the DSG [Deputy Secretary-General] aware of this document as he goes to the African Union Summit…?
Spokesman:  I think the DSG is fully aware of the situation in Burundi and would be looking forward to his discussion with Mr. Djinnit.
  We'll see.
Two days after civil society groups in Burundi wrote to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon how his envoy Said Djinnit should be removed from the role, here, on June 10 Djinnit issued a press statement "taking note" of this position - and stepping down or back. 
  On June 11 Inner City Press asked UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric whose decision the resignation was -- Djinnit's, he said -- and if the UN is going to try to replace him as facilitator.
  Dujarric said that UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson is headed to the African Union meeting in South Africa on June 14, along with Djinnit, and will be holding discussion including on Burundi there. Dujarric mentioned it is a question of which organization a facilitator should represented.
  Inner City Press has received a copy of the same civil society groups' which requested that Djinnit step down new letter to the East African Community for an emergency summit.
   Inner City Press for the Free UN Coalition for Access asked Dujarric about the spokesman for the police and security ministry blaming ongoing demonstrations on journalists, at least 50 of whom have already fled the country.